12 Trends to Watch in Enterprise Security for 2014

Security is a long term trend that just continues to grow in importance as the number of potential entrances that can be exploited grows.  Today’s CIOs have security on their mind 24×7.

As new technologies like cloud, mobile and social take the IT landscape by storm, security risks grow exponentially.  The data center is more vulnerable than ever.  New threats are  emerging daily and even hourly.  For this reason, it is no longer enough for organizations, or even entire governments, to try to address security strictly within their own enterprises, they must understand and protect all the the potential external risks.

In my  report “Enterprise IT Security Trends To Watch In 2014” available on Slideshare, I provide the following list of twelve trends I am watching this year around the Enterprise Security Trend.

  1. “Target”ed Attacks: Expect more targeted and coordinated attacks (like we saw at Target) that are successful in disrupting service and fraudulently obtaining significant amounts of intellectual property.
  2. CISO Role:  As a result of attacks, more enterprises will institute the Chief Information Security Officer role and task them with developing a corporate wide security strategy.
  3. More Complexity: IT Security continues to become very complex, thanks to the ‘third platform” of mobile, social, big data, and cloud. Enterprises must guard against both theft of data, fraud, etc. and hacking into systems and infrastructures.. Security skills will be in high demand.
  4. Encryption:  Expect a huge interest in encryption technologies as enterprises realize that unencrypted data traffic behind the firewall is vulnerable to detection from outsiders.
  5. Biometrics:  The acceptance of biometrics has been very gradual. In 2014, we will see increased adoption of biometrics as a way to transition from the traditional user ID/password combination used most frequently to verify online identities.
  6. Internet of Things:  Need to secure enterprise systems against unwelcome access by Sensors, M2M Devices, Wearables and Embedded Systems.
  7. Security Automation:  Enterprises will invest in better security management facilities, the use of analytics and intelligence to identify trends and usage patterns, and the ability to monitor, report, and act on security intelligence.
  8. Smarter Malware:  Malicious code authors are very adept at camouflaging their work. They will get smarter in 2014. Expect mobile to be a target.
  9. Mobile Threats:  Mobile usage overtakes PCs. Mobile security platform weaknesses are giving rise to new threats. In 2014 hackers/criminals will increasingly target Mobile email, apps, platforms, wallets, and app stores.
  10. BYOWearables:  Employees will be bringing their Smart Glasses, Watches, and Health Monitors to work with them, causing more complexity for I.T. Security professionals.
  11. Device & Location Important:  Enterprises begin analyzing both device and location information to help them understand the potential context of the user’s attempt to access the network.
  12. BYOS:  Expect a rise in “bring your own security” scenarios, in which employees using their own mobile devices for work also employ their own personal security measures – often without the consent or awareness of enterprise security managers.

 

3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Trend Report

I’ve published my 2014 Trend report on 3D Printing.  The 76 page powerpoint slide deck provides an overview of 3D Printing trend along marketplace research and insights and hundreds of links to additional resources.

About 3D Printing:  Also called Additive Manufacturing, 3D printing has been hailed as a transformative manufacturing technology, 3D printing involves fabrication of physical objects by depositing a material using a nozzle, print head, or any another printer technology. Though initially used for prototyping of products, 3D printing has evolved and is currently capable of customized short-run manufacturing of industrial products, dental implants, and medical devices. The reality is that 3D printing is finding use in a diverse range of applications across varied markets.

Technological advancements are increasingly facilitating the use of 3D printers for manufacturing final products. The technology has now reached a stage where digital models can be replicated to produce physical components or prototypes, which would be similar to those of mass produced products. The declining cost of printers has led a wide range of industries ranging from aerospace and automotive to footwear and jewelry to adopt 3D printing technology for manufacturing desired objects. 3D printing technology is thus offering individuals as well as companies with the ability to design as well as manufacture objects at relatively lower costs.

Table of Contents
My 2014 trend report includes the following table of contents.
1.Introduction to 3D Printing
2.Marketplace Opportunities and Industry Applications
3.Materials & Technologies
4.Vendor Ecosystem
5.Drivers, Challenges, Implications, Trends to Watch
6.Summary / Recommendations
7.Appendix:   Resources for further reading & understanding

 

15 Wearable Computing Trends To Watch

I’ve just published my trend report on the topic of Wearable Computing.  You can get a summary PDF out on my HorizonWatching Slideshare account

In my report, you will find the following list of 15 trends to watch around the topic of Wearable Computing.

15 Wearable Trends to Watch in 2014

  1. Fitness Trackers:  Enterprises will increasingly give trackers to employees as part of health and wellness programs. Overtime, trackers will experience increased competition from other wearables, including smart clothing.
  2. SmartWatches:  Expect more fashionable and functional watches to hit the market in 2014. Smartwatch developers must focus on cutting prices, adding more apps, and improving the look to attract broad consumer interest. The expected iWatch announcement from Apple might just do for watches what the iPhone did for mobile phones
  3. Smart Glasses:  Expect a number of announcements in 2014 within smart glasses, which has huge potential for any workforce that could benefit from access to hands free computing. Google isn’t the only game in town. Vuzix, GlassUp, Recon Instruments and Telepathy are ones to watch too.
  4. Smart Clothing:  Real, working smart clothing might be a bit further off, but it’s on its way. Smart Clothing like OMSignal, Hexoskin and Athos will lead the way.
  5. Fashion Required!!:  For consumer wearables to really take off, they must be fashionable. In 2014, look for leading device manufacturers to focus on the fashion and style of these devices.
  6. Healthcare Monitors:  Wearable technology is likely to significantly disrupt our healthcare model as we know it, helping doctors and patients keep track of real-time health data in ways never capable before.
  7. Enterprise Adoption:  In 2014 leading edge companies will begin to explore using wearables not only for employee wellness programs, but for other applications designed to improve worker productivity.
  8. New Business Processes:  As wearables enter the workforce, we will find new ways to use these devices to help us make better business decisions. Business process engineers will explore new ways to reengineer older business processes in order to do just that.
  9. Wearables Apps: New apps are required to integrate wearable data into business applications. As the user base grows for wearables, so too will the developer community which will bring some new and exciting use cases for wearables including some killer features that will justify their need.
  10. Big Data to get Bigger:  Wearables, a subset of Internet of Things, will produce even more data than we have now, taxing our already complex enterprise Information Management systems and data warehouses.
  11. Wearables Analytics:  Advanced analytics and dashboards will be needed to provide insights from all the wearables. Some wearable devices will have embedded analytics and cognitive capability right on the device.
  12. Wearable Communications:  In the future, wearables will communicate not only with smartphones, but with other ‘things’, both other wearables and other sensors/devices. This ability to communicate seamlessly andd transparently will provide new and innovative capabilities for enterprises to leverage wearables.
  13. Security: In 2014, IT professionals will need to decide how to cope with the increasing threat from wearables.  For those who found implementing BYOD a challenge over the past few years, expect the bring your own wearable (BYOW) issues to be much harder to figure out
  14. Privacy:  There will be increased interest on the part of consumers to 1) protect the personal data that is being collected via their own wearables and 2) protect against unlawful video recording from smartglasses and other cameras.
  15. Ecosystem Partnerships:  Traditional IT vendors accelerate their partnerships with wearable providers, mobile app developers, global telecom service providers and semiconductor vendors.

 

Friday Gadget: The BIOSwimmer Fish Robot

BioSwimmer1The Biomimetic In-Oil Swimmer (BIO-Swimmer) is an robotic fish that has been under development the last 4-5 years by Boston Engineering Corporation’s Advanced Systems Group in Waltham, MA, for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is tasked with uncovering attempts to damage, disrupt, or illegally use the flow of commerce; without detection.  As you can imagine, this is a challenging process.  With regard to waterways, a balance needs to be maintained between monitoring ports, rivers and other waterways without slowing commerce.  The BIOSwimmer is being developed to help the U.S. secure and protect these very waterways.  It is a fish-inspired (it looks like a Tuna) robot that can be deployed rapidly.  It is designed to maneuver into locations previously inaccessible to current robots and provide security intelligence far beyond current capability.

The robot is a hybrid of the design features of a regular submarine (i.e. dive planes, thruster-powered locomotion, and a rigid hull) combined with the flexible keel of a fish.  The tuna is used as a biological model because its natural swimming gait holds the front 2/3 of the fish’s body rigid, while the rear 1/3 moves; this allows the robot to utilize the front 2/3 of its body as a rigid, watertight hull, while the rear 1/3 is converted into a flooded flexible structure. The robot uses hydraulic actuators to move the flexible tail structure from side to side and electric motors for dive plane control.

It is a drone that is controlled via laptop-based system, so it requires a human operator.  It uses an onboard camera and computer suite for navigation, sensor processing, and communications.  It has onboard sensors which are designed for the challenging environment of constricted spaces and high viscosity fluids that are found in crowded and active ports on our waterways.   

All this capability produces a robotic fish-inspired drone that can both move through the water quickly and turn on a dime, a set of traits not usually seen together in underwater vehicles of any type. 

The BIOSwimmer will be expected to perform tasks like conducting ship hull inspections; performing search and rescue missions; and checking cargo holds that may have toxic fluids.   It can inspect the interior voids of ships such as flooded bilges and tanks, and hard to reach external areas such as steerage, propulsion and sea chests.  It can also inspect and protect harbors and piers, perform area searches and carry out other security missions. 

Wearable Computing: 2014 HorizonWatching Trend Report

I’ve just published my trend report on the topic of Wearable Computing.  You can get a the PDF out on my HorizonWatching Slideshare account

About Wearables:

Wearable devices incorporate advanced electronic technologies that allow for activity tracking via sensors, wireless communications, and computing capability normally found in smartphones.

Based on all my research and reading…all signs point towards wearable computing  (wearables as they are becoming known) becoming the next big thing in consumer technology products. Fitness trackers are exploding on the market and there is a whole new categories wearables that are being launched as accessories to smartphones, including smartwatches and smartglasses.  And there are also emerging categories such as smartrings, wearable healthcare monitors, smartclothing, and heads-up displays.   And just like smartphones made their way into the enterprise, so will wearables.

The future of wearables looks bright as it  leverages the 3rd computing platform and is at the intersection of internet of things and mobile computing.  Wearable devices incorporate advanced electronic technologies that allow for activity tracking via sensors, wireless communications, and computing capability normally found in smartphones.  In the future, they will be able to communicate with other computers, mobile devices, wearables and ‘things’ in the Internet of Things.

15 Wearable Trends to Watch in 2014

  1. Fitness Trackers:  Enterprises will increasingly give trackers to employees as part of health and wellness programs. Overtime, trackers will experience increased competition from other wearables, including smart clothing.
  2. SmartWatches:  Expect more fashionable and functional watches to hit the market in 2014. Smartwatch developers must focus on cutting prices, adding more apps, and improving the look to attract broad consumer interest. The expected iWatch announcement from Apple might just do for watches what the iPhone did for mobile phones
  3. Smart Glasses:  Expect a number of announcements in 2014 within smart glasses, which has huge potential for any workforce that could benefit from access to hands free computing. Google isn’t the only game in town. Vuzix, GlassUp, Recon Instruments and Telepathy are ones to watch too.
  4. Smart Clothing:  Real, working smart clothing might be a bit further off, but it’s on its way. Smart Clothing like OMSignal, Hexoskin and Athos will lead the way.
  5. Fashion Required!!:  For consumer wearables to really take off, they must be fashionable. In 2014, look for leading device manufacturers to focus on the fashion and style of these devices.
  6. Healthcare Monitors:  Wearable technology is likely to significantly disrupt our healthcare model as we know it, helping doctors and patients keep track of real-time health data in ways never capable before.
  7. Enterprise Adoption:  In 2014 leading edge companies will begin to explore using wearables not only for employee wellness programs, but for other applications designed to improve worker productivity.
  8. New Business Processes:  As wearables enter the workforce, we will find new ways to use these devices to help us make better business decisions. Business process engineers will explore new ways to reengineer older business processes in order to do just that.
  9. Wearables Apps: New apps are required to integrate wearable data into business applications. As the user base grows for wearables, so too will the developer community which will bring some new and exciting use cases for wearables including some killer features that will justify their need.
  10. Big Data to get Bigger:  Wearables, a subset of Internet of Things, will produce even more data than we have now, taxing our already complex enterprise Information Management systems and data warehouses.
  11. Wearables Analytics:  Advanced analytics and dashboards will be needed to provide insights from all the wearables. Some wearable devices will have embedded analytics and cognitive capability right on the device.
  12. Wearable Communications:  In the future, wearables will communicate not only with smartphones, but with other ‘things’, both other wearables and other sensors/devices. This ability to communicate seamlessly andd transparently will provide new and innovative capabilities for enterprises to leverage wearables.
  13. Security: In 2014, IT professionals will need to decide how to cope with the increasing threat from wearables.  For those who found implementing BYOD a challenge over the past few years, expect the bring your own wearable (BYOW) issues to be much harder to figure out
  14. Privacy:  There will be increased interest on the part of consumers to 1) protect the personal data that is being collected via their own wearables and 2) protect against unlawful video recording from smartglasses and other cameras.
  15. Ecosystem Partnerships:  Traditional IT vendors accelerate their partnerships with wearable providers, mobile app developers, global telecom service providers and semiconductor vendors.

Friday Gadget: Concepts for Future Glass Display Applications

I took a few weeks off from Friday Gadget posts as I was on my spring break with my family.  This week I am back with a post the future of displays.

The post today features a concept video from Corning Glass that is actually a couple of years old.  The video is a montage from its “A Day Made of Glass” series of videos that they created in 2011 and 2012.   Even though the video montage I am sharing below was made a couple of years ago, it is very, very relevant today.  The video provides us with a fantastic view of the potential futures of applications that involve glass displays.    Even if you have seen the videos, its worth another look. 

The video was produced to share Corning’s vision on how glass will help create a more connected, collaborative, and interactive world.  The video features a family of four going about a “normal day,” aided by glass-pane tablets and touchscreen walls. But the latest video reveals an even broader view of the role specialty glass could play in the “near future,” reaching out of the home and into hospitals, schools, even parks.

The video is embedded below and is 5 minutes in length.  I guarantee it is worth the time.  It will really get you thinking about how we might interact with information in the future.  As you watch the video, think about the emerging “3rd” computing platform that is made up of technologies like big data, analytics, data visualization, cloud computing, social business, mobile computing, wearables, internet of things, cognitive computing, and human computer interaction.  The video does a great job of showing how all those technologies, when fully integrated into solutions and services, can make a significant impact in our lives.

Corning is, of course, very much focused on selling the future of glass.  Their stated vision is “Interactive glass surfaces, seamless delivery of real-time information, and technologies that enrich your life”.  The company creates and makes specialty glasses that are critical components within the concept products shown in the videos.   The vivid displays, durable touch surfaces, or instant, real-time communications shown in the videos, each require some form of specialty glass.   Learn more about Corning’s innovations in glass.

IBM Announces 11 New IBM Fellows

Video: 50th Anniversary of the IBM Fellow Program

IBM is a great place to work because there are so many smart people.  And the best of the bunch are called IBM Fellows

The IBM Fellows program was founded in 1962 by Thomas J. Watson, Jr., as a way to promote creativity among the company’s “most exceptional” technical professionals. The following year, the first appointments were made and the tradition has since carried on every year. The Fellow honor acknowledges an IBM Researcher’s important contributions and industry-leading innovations in developing some of the world’s most important technologies.

Recently, IBM announced a record number of eleven scientists to the 2014 class of IBM Fellows.  The 2014 IBM Fellows have influenced a broad array of technologies in the following areas: Brain-inspired cognitive computing, security platforms, computational science, cloud computing, business database and analytics, and high performance, enterprise storage technologies. IBM Fellows have a history of pushing the boundaries of science and technology to deliver improved solutions for constantly changing, global business needs.

The 2014 IBM Fellows represent a microcosm of IBM’s diverse global research and technical community. Their backgrounds vary—from a village in southern India to the holy city of Jerusalem to a small town in central Kentucky.   However, from different starting points, today these 11 leaders in their respective fields have reached the same destination…they are now IBM Fellows.

Congrats to the new IBM Fellows!

31 Influential Tech Writers Covering the Emerging Wearable Computing Market

Wearable Computing is an emerging trend that will have an impact across consumer and enterprise markets.  I like to think of Wearable devices as another ‘thing’ in the billions of sensors that makes of the emerging Internet of Things.  Over the next decade critical consumer and business applications will make use of these wearable sensors to help us all make decisions about how we can improve our lives and business outcomes.

Next week I will post my trend report “Wearable Computing Technology” to slideshare where it will be available for download.   I’m still working on finalizing that trend report, but the current draft has about 80 slides packed with information on Wearable Computing Technology and the potential impact on enterprises.

One of the slides I will have in that deck will have the following list of Tech Writers/Journalists who are following Wearables market…and who have over 1,000 followers on Twitter.  These are all influential writers who are interested in how the Wearables market is developing.  They have all recently authored articles about the Wearable Computing trend.

I’ve included their Twitter ID below along with a recent pull of how many followers they have on Twitter.  The list is sorted by that follower count.

  1. Dan Farber, Former Editor at CBS Interactive, dbfarber,  31200
  2. Stephen Shankland, Senior writer at CNET News, stshank,  23200
  3. Anthony Ha,  TechCrunch writer, anthonyha,  20200
  4. Todd Wasserman, Mashable business editor, ToddWasserman,  16400
  5. Don Reisinger, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  donreisinger,  14500
  6. Jay Yarow,  Blogger/Writer, Business Insider,  jyarow,  11100
  7. Samantha Murphy Kelly,  Blogger/Writer, Mashable,  HeySamantha,  11000
  8. Frederic Lardinois,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  fredericl,  11000
  9. Darrell Etherington,  BloggerWriter at TechCrunch,  drizzled,  9088
  10. Zack Whittaker,  Writer, editor. @ZDNet, @CNET,  zackwhittaker,  8538
  11. Steve Kovach,  Senior tech editor at Business Insider,  stevekovach,  8486
  12. Rip Empson,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  ripemp,  7736
  13. Steve O’Hear,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  sohear,  7479
  14. Scott Stein,  CNET Senior Editor,  jetscott, 7478
  15. Pete Pachal,  Tech Editor at @Mashable,  petepachal,  7426
  16. Lance Whitney,  Blogger/Writer, CNET,  lancewhit,  7214
  17. Matt Burns,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  mjburnsy,  6175
  18. Brad Molen,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  phonewisdom,  5426
  19. Jordan Crook,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch, jordanrcrook,  5212
  20. Shara Tibken, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  sharatibken,  4653
  21. Chris Velazco,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  chrisvelazco, 4577
  22. Dara Kerr, Blogger/Writer, CNET, darakerr,  4356
  23. Brooke Crothers, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  mbrookec,  4331
  24. Jon Fingas,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  jonfingas,  4163
  25. Mark Johnson,  CEO, Zite,  philosophygeek,  3533
  26. Chris Matyszczyk,  Blogger/Writer, CNET,  ChrisMatyszczyk,  3478
  27. Jon Phillips,  Editor-in-chief of @PCWorld and @agreenbot,  JonPhillipsSF,  2195
  28. Daniel Cooper,  Blogger, Engadget,  danielwcooper,  2129
  29. Sharif Sakr,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  shotsheriff,  1857
  30. H. James Wilson,  Harvard Business Review writer and blogger,  hjameswilson,  1820
  31. Vignesh Ramachandran,  Blogger/Writer, Mashable,  VigneshR, 1012