Culture Plays A Big Part In Social Business Adoption

A couple colleagues recently reached out to me on the topic of how best to implement social business within a mature company.  Some employees seem to flock to the latest collaboration and social technologies on their own.  Most employees seem unsure why they should be using these technologies and how to go about getting started.   Finally, some employees want to avoid social and collaboration technologies at all costs.

The fact is that emerging technologies do get a lot of hype and sometimes leaders decide to implement these new hyped technologies without the proper understanding of the change that will be required in business processes and what the impact that will have on employees.

The bottom line for me with any new emerging technology…whether it is is analytics, cloud computing, or social business is that successful implementations of new technologies must have three strategy elements integrated and in place 1) Technology Strategy (the new emerging applications and tools)  2) People Strategy (changes to skills, organization, and culture) 3)  Business Process Strategy (changes to tasks, activities, etc.). 

Too often I see a focus on the technology strategy too much without a focus on the other two.  It's like a three legged stool….if one or two legs are bad the stool falls down.   The business leader must focus on having the proper people and processes in place and that often depends on the culture that business leader develops and promotes within the organization.  Leaders who give the green light to implementing new technologies without understanding the impact on people and processes, will only see those technology initiatives fail.

So my message and advice is that culture does play a big part in implementing change within a mature corporation.  In my mind, culture change is the responsibility of our business leaders and therefore leaders should not implement new emerging technologies unless they understand the impact on people and processes.

Regarding the topic of implementing social business and the cultural implications of doing so, I’ve developed a list of links for those of you who would like to read up more on this topic.  Enjoy.

For more information on the Social Business trend itself, check out my other Social Business related blog posts

Learning about the Social Business trend: Three IBM White Papers

I’ve written before about the social business trend and it’s impact on businesses (see The Social Business Train Is Leaving The Station Are You On It? and A Social Business Strategy Can Make A Company More Responsive and Agile). 

I believe that the social business trend will have a profound impact on the architecture and design of future businesses.  Business processes will change and that will lead to required changes in application software.  Those businesses that make the successful transition will be more agile, more responsive, and more successful than others.

This post provides links to three white papers found on IBM’s Social Business website.  IBM has been on the forefront of the social collaboration and social media marketplace, learning how to leverage these technologies internally.  These white papers provide a great overview of social business, the potential value of the trend, and the challenges all businesses must overcome to become a true social business.

The Social Business: advent of a new age

ibm soc biz - The Social Business (February 2011) This 10 page white paper written by the Lotus team at IBM Software Group defines what a social business is and what it takes to become one.  It puts forth the view that businesses are entering an inflection point where social computing and social media are about to be fully integrated into enterprise application design.  The table of contents are: 

  • Introduction
  • What does it mean to be a Social Business?
  • What is the value of Social Business?
    • Deepen customer Relationships
    • Drive operational efficiencies
    • Optimize the workforce
  • Preparing for the future
  • The right partner for a changing world
  • For more information

Becoming a Social Business: the IBM story

ibm soc biz - Becoming a social business January 2011)  This IBM-sponsored 14 page white paper was written by IDC’s Erin Traudt and Richard Vancil.  In this paper, IDC provides three case studies that describe IBM's internal evolution to a social business.  The paper then uses the learnings from these case studies in order to provide guidance to other large organizations considering making the transformation to a social business.  

  • IDC Opinion
  • Methodology
  • In This White Paper
  • Situation Overview
  • Case Studies
    • IBM DeveloperWorks
    • From Individual Contributor to Community Manager
    • BlueIQ
  • Future Outlook
  • Challenges / Opportunities
  • Conclusion

 

Jamming on social business

ibm soc biz - Jamming on social business (April 2011) Exploring new approaches for the next era of business.  This IBM white paper provides a review of the key findings from a 72-hour online brainstorming session held in February 2011 between over 2,700 participants from over 80 countries.  This report summarizes the key insights gathered from the all the conversations, comments, and tweets. 

The table of the contents of this report reads as follows:

  • The Social Business Jam
  • What is a Jam?
  • Jam insights
    • Building the social business of the future
    • Building participatory organizations through social adoption
    • Using social media to understand and engage with customers
    • What social means for IT
    • Identifying risks and establishing governance
  • Our jamming experience
  • Next Steps

If you are tasked with learning about the social business trend, these three white papers are an excellent resource for you.  More information and case studies can be found at the IBM Social Business website.  For those of you who want to follow the discussion on Twitter, search on the hashtag #socbiz.

A Primer on the Website Personalization Trend

The Personalized Web will be driven by analytic engines that will integrate data from many sources in order to present an online experienced tailored to each user.

Thanks to the explosion of social media, how users are influenced, consume information, and make purchasing decisions has been altered forever.  Users are increasingly expecting company websites, products, and services to be tailored to their individual preferences, past experiences, and what they happen to be doing at this very moment.  This puts the demand on business and IT leaders to create a personalized and engaging experience for end-users across all channels, both online and offline. 

image

                Unica: The State of Marketing 2010 (link)

Users want to their experience to be customized:

  • Returning visitors to a web site want to see a page based on all the information collected from previous visits.  Businesses should present personalized sites to these customers by organizing information and prioritizing it based on the individual's liking.  Products and services offered on those pages will be pre-configured.
  • “Anonymous” visitors to websites should get customized messages based on the referring URL, search terms, geo-location and any other insights. 

In 2011, I expect business leaders to focus on advanced solutions that can delivering a more personalized experience to end users.  These solutions will be designed to mine the user profile, buying behavior, browsing behavior and other insights obtained through marketing analytics in order to deliver a more customized and personalized online experience.  Look for further improvements in technologies such as marketing analytics and predictive algorithms that can automatically deliver highly relevant, contextually aware, personalized content and recommendations to customers via both online and offline channels. I also expect the personalization trend to be extended beyond the website to other digital channels, including social media marketing, mobile marketing, and email marketing.

One other point, the personalization trend is not only about presenting personalized pages to users of sales and marketing processes. All business application users can benefit from web sites and applications that present information that is personalized to the user. 

The rest of this post provides you with some background information on the trend, some quotes from the marketplace, and a bunch of links to additional reading information.

Trend Drivers

  • Individuals want content that is personalized and is relevant to why they are on a particular website at a given time /
  • New analytic capability

Trend Inhibitors/Challenges

  • Integrating offline as well as online behaviour
  • Need to build and retain complete profile data
  • Privacy issues

Trend Implications

  • New business processes and skills required
  • Need to track individual’s interactions and transactions across all channels, in order to provide the best offer or communication.
  • Messaging plans can be tailored to interests and preferences of each individual.

Quotes from the Marketplace: 

“Emerging context-enriched services will use location, presence, social attributes and other environmental information to anticipate an end user's immediate needs, offering more-sophisticated, situation-aware and usable functions” – Gartner (link)

“Marketers are focused on making their communications more timely and relevant to recipients. To do that, they need to build communications around the interests and preferences of each individual customer or prospect. “ – Unica, Sept. 2010 (link)

“Personalized product recommendations are proven to consistently increase sales, conversion rates, average order value and customer retention“ – Coremetrics, Oct 2010 (link)

Featured Video

Personalising the Web Experience – Unica Video

For More Information

Here are some sites where you will find links to other learning resources like white papers, demos, customer briefs, and videos

More Information From ibm.com

You Are Invited To The Social Business Jam

Last week, I posted about the emergence of the Social Business term to represent the next stage in how companies are using social and collaboration technologies in order to conduct business.  My post “The Social Business Train Is Leaving The Station Are You On It?” provides an overview of the trend and makes the case for why it is important.

As a follow-up, I wanted you to be aware of the Social Business Jam.  On February 8-11, 2011 IBM will host the Social Business Jam (www.ibm.com/social/businessjam).  Should you register, you will have the opportunity to collaborate with leading experts on topics such as:

  • Building the Social Business of the Future
  • Building Participatory Organizations Through Social Adoption
  • Using Social to Understand and Engage with Customers
  • What does Social mean for IT?
  • Identifying Risks and Establishing Governance

I will be jamming…along with some leading Social Business experts, including:

  • Charlene Li, Founder of Altimeter Group, Author of “Groundswell”
  • Mei Li Tan, CMO, Treasury & Trade Solutions, Citigroup
  • Steve Wylie, GM of Enterprise 2.0 Conference
  • Vittorio Cretella, CIO, Mars Inc.

Join me in the Jam.  Should be an interesting discussion.  It all starts February 8th, so register NOW!!!  www.ibm.com/social/businessjam

For those of you on Twitter, we’ll be using the hashtag #sbjam 

The Social Business Train Is Leaving The Station: Are You On It?

Social Business I expect the Social Business topic to be among the most talked about trends in 2011…and all that buzz is justified.    In fact, the buzz will kickoff next week as IBM conducts it’s Social Business Jam February 8-11, 2011.  I’ll post more about the Jam next week, but for now, head on over to http://www-01.ibm.com/software/info/social_business_jam/ and register for the Jam. 

Social collaboration is changing the way business is being conducted. Enterprise processes are being transformed by social technologies. Over the next 10-15 years, social computing capability will becomes part of every business function within the company.  I fully expect that social capabilities will become embedded in every single website, computing device for every participant in every single business transaction. 

In the future, all participants involved in a company’s business processes and transactions will have the ability to share content, comment on content, rate/vote on content, and collaborate in an open and sharing environment.  In addition, all this social activity will generate data that will be mined and analyzed in both batch and in real-time.  The insights generated will be a critical input into all business processes, including research, product development, marketing, sales, technical support, and even business processes like accounting, procurement, and legal. 

Since social will eventually be embedded in every business process and transaction workflow, social computing capability will need to be a critical part of every business application.  As a result, I expect entire business application suites will be rewritten to make use of social collaboration features.

Analyst Perspectives

“The social business model is changing the way companies generate and conduct business online, and IDC believes that this model will have a long-lasting impact“ – IDC (link)

“Social Technologies Will Drive The Next Wave Of BPM Suites” – Forrester (link)

“Just as the Internet had a disruptive impact on organizations' processes and business models at the beginning of the decade, today social media is changing the way business is conducted”. – Gartner (Link)

“Business application vendors are integrating social features into their applications and the dividing lines between transactional tools and social environments are fading.” – Gartner (Link)

“To optimize investments, competencies, and outcome, it is essential that enterprises establish a shared understanding of social technologies and trends, coordinate strategies and initiatives, and leverage investments.“ – Gartner (Link)

Implications

  • This will require a cultural transformation within most older, established companies.
  • Business leaders must realize that 80% of success of social business efforts will come from strategy, planning, roles, and processes — only 20% will come from the technology platform.
  • The path to a Social Business requires definition, education, and career paths.
  • Centralized implementation may be required for company-wide social tools, standards, policies and practices
  • Social capabilities will become embedded in every single website, computing device for every participant in every single business transaction. 

An important thing to realize is that the success of implementing social technologies into mature businesses will be how well business leaders can lead a cultural transformation in order to leverage these new social technologies.  Business leaders must realize that 80% of success of social business efforts will come from strategy, planning, roles, and processes — only 20% will come from the technology platform. All these new capabilities will require new Career Paths and Education tailored to the new social technologies. 

The Social Business Train Is Leaving The Station….are you on it yet?

For More Information

Cloud Computing Is Enabling The Next Phase Of The Internet Evolution

Carlota Perez wrote a book titled “Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital” (2002) that is a real interesting read.  Perez says that there have been five historical waves of economic and social transformation in the developed economies of the world. Each of these waves have what she calls an Installation phase followed by a crash of some sort and then a Deployment period. 

HorizonWatching - Carlota Perz 5 Waves

Perez says that our global economy has now entered the deployment phase of the fifth technology investment cycle, which she says is the Age of Information and Telecommunications (see embedded picture).  Perez says that this will be a period of adjustment when novel business models will exploit the new IT infrastructure that is now being put in place that enable more porous, open, collaborative approaches that seek to leverage the economics and flexibility of global sourcing.  She expects enterprises of all sizes will employ technology to help them transform their business models, processes and operations.

As mentioned, Perez says we are entering this Deployment phase. As we do there are some key characteristics across our global economy that is impacting how this phase develops. The firms that will succeed are the firms that will embrace these characteristics and the change that is happening in order to innovate and leapfrog competition.

Important characteristics of our global economy includes:

  • A level, global economic playing field presents new opportunities, challenges and competitive technologies
  • New technologies, services and skills are emerging…and they are quickly being integrated into every aspect of business and everyday life
  • The pace of change is dramatically compressing “windows of opportunity” for real competitive advantage.
  • Billions of skilled people are entering the world’s economy, fundamentally transforming the mix of the global workforce
  • The interconnected nature of our world’s economy means businesses must be prepared to respond to – and capitalize on – changes in real time, with unprecedented flexibility.

While all this is happening, we are moving into what I believe is the third stage of the Internet. Call it Web 3.0 or whatever you wish, but cloud computing is perhaps the most important technology.  In fact, I believe that cloud computing is the key enabling technology for this next technological wave and the next phase in the evolution of the Internet.

HorizonWatching - Private Clouds Enables Next Wave of the Internet

Back in the mid to late 1990s companies were just concerned with getting websites up so they could have a presence on the Internet. It was all about providing very basic information to the public. But soon the so called e-commerce trend arose and business was being conducted on the Internet. Then Web 2.0 came into play and all users realized that they could share their ideas, create content, and collaborate online.  We are now well into this next phase of the evolution where the enabling technologies will be cloud, analytics, mobile, video, and semantic capabilities.  This so called Web 3.0 phase will provide applications that are much more immersive, social, and collaborative in nature.  Combined that with an explosion of networked sensors and advanced predictive analytic and all the Smarter Planet initiatives will become a reality. 

But the most important enabler will be the combination of private and public cloud computing infrastructures that will be the ‘engine’ of the future Internet.

Enterprise 2.0: The Value of Online Communities

The trend of building online Communities of Practices and Customer Communities is an important trend I’ve been watching (and leading/participating in) for a number of years.  I often get asked:  What is the business value of online communities? 

Unfortunately community platforms are lacking tools for community leaders that would allow us to track and measure the impact that these communities have on business results.  So it is a very subjective measurement today.  Note to community platform vendors:  Community Leaders need better dashboard tools.

I have established a graphic that I use to explain the power of communities and the value it can generate to an enterprise.  The story line to the graphic goes something like this:  Community Participation leads to increased Enterprise Knowledge, which leads to improved Organizational Capabilities, which results in positive Business Value for enterprises.  

Here’s my stab at a graphic (Note:  Click on the picture to enlarge and reformat)

Value of Communities

(Click on picture to enlarge) 

Do you have any better graphics, reports, or slide decks that illustrate the business value of communities?  If so, please let me know!   For some resources I’ve uncovered on the value and ROI of social media and online communities, check out my previous post:  Learning About The ROI of Social Media and Online Communities

Social Media Case Studies and Lessons Learned

HorizonWatch Blog Post Title Want to learn more about how other companies have leveraged social media to help them achieve their business objectives and goals? 

This post provides links to resources, blog posts, and articles that can help you understand just how transformational social media can be to helping businesses increase growth and/or drive productivity to improve the bottom line.  I’ve included links to lots of case studies and examples that can help you find ways to embed social computing into the framework of every enterprise business process.  Learn from case studies and lessons of others that have already experimented with social media.

I’ve categorized the resources found below into four sections:

  1. Marketing Case Studies and Lessons
  2. Customer Service Case Studies and Lessons
  3. Product Development Case Studies and Lessons
  4. General Case Studies and Lessons 

I hope you explore the links, learn from them, and then develop your own social computing strategies.  Enjoy!

Marketing Case Studies and Lessons

Customer Service Case Studies and Lessons

Product Development Case Studies and Lessons

General Case Studies and Lessons

Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media


Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media

Yesterday my post here was titled 2009 CIO Award Winners Are Not Embracing Social Media.  In that post I provided the results of some research I did to understand if CIOs and IT Leaders who had received Industry related awards in 2009 were participating in the social media.  I found that those award winners I did research on had not embraced the social media trend.

Today, I provide the other end of the spectrum:  The Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media. 

For this post, I set out to find those practicing CIOs, CTOs, and IT Leaders who have embraced the social media with passion.  I scoured the Net to find CIO’s that are blogging and tweeting about issues and events that are important to CIOs and the IT industry in general.  These are the CIOs that are actively creating and participating in discussions in the social media.  They are sharing their experiences and ideas in the public Internet, instead of holding these experiences and ideas to themselves.

In addition to the blogging and tweeting, I was also interested in finding CIOs that were actively building their LinkedIn profile and connecting with others through LinkedIn.  

I found about 65 CIOs during my research.  I then developed a ranking system by scoring CIOs on a number of criteria, including the currency and frequency of their blog posts, the richness of their LinkedIn profile, and their participation on Twitter.  A quick sort by the total score and I have a list of the top 50 as displayed below.

Some stats from the list of 50.

  • 80% of those on the list are blogging on a public website.
  • 92% are actively using Twitter
  • 96% have a LinkedIn profile
  • 66% are on Facebook (note:  Facebook usage did not enter into my scoring and ranking system)

So here is the list of the top 50 CIO and IT Leaders I came up with.  I’ve provided links to their Blogs, their Twitter IDs, and their LinkedIn Profiles.  I encourage you to explore those links and learn from their posts and tweets.  More importantly, I encourage you to  participate in the discussions they are having by commenting on their blogs and responding to their tweets.  Perhaps they will even inspire you to start blogging or tweeting your ideas and thoughts about the important issues facing CIOs today.

Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in Social Media

   

Name

Title/Industry/Social Sites

1

John Moore

CTO, and SVP of Engineering at Swimfish

Industry:  Technology  

LinkedIn:  John Moore

Blog:  John Moore's Weblog

Twitter: JohnFMoore

2

Phil Windley, Ph.D

CTO, Kynetx

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Phil Windley

Blog:  Windley’s Techometria

Twitter: windley

3

Bob Gourley

CTO and founder of Crucial Point LLC

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Bob Gourley

Blog:  CTOvision.com

Twitter: bobgourley

3

Andy Blumenthal

CTO, Bureau of ATF

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Andy Blumenthal

Blog:  Andy Blumenthal

Twitter: totalcio

5

John Halamka, MD

CIO, Harvard

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  John Halamka

Blog:  Healthcare CIO

Twitter: jhalamka

6

Chuck Musciano

CIO at Martin Marietta Materials

Industry:  Manufacturing/Aerospace

LinkedIn:  Chuck Musciano

Blog:  The Effective CIO

Twitter: EffectiveCIO

6

Werner Vogels

CTO, Amazon.com

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Werner Vogels

Blog:  All Things Distributed

Twitter: werner

6

Andrew Hoppin

CIO, New York State Senate

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Andrew Hoppin

Blog:  globehoppin

Twitter: ahoppin

9

Padmasree Warrior

CTO, Cisco

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
CiscoCTO Blog

Twitter: Padmasree

9

Shawn Riley

CTO, Austin Med. Cntr., Mayo Clinic Health System

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Shawn Riley

Blog:  HealthTechnica

Twitter: rilescat

11

Mark Cummuta

CIO @JobAngels

Industry:  Consumer Services

LinkedIn:  Mark Cummuta

Blog:  CIO Job Search

Twitter: TriumphCIO

11

Dave Fletcher

CIO, State of Utah

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Dave Fletcher

Blog:  Dave Fletcher's Gov. and Tech. Weblog

Twitter: dfletcher

11

John David Son

CIO, Marshall County School District

Industry:  Education

LinkedIn:  John Son

Blog:  CIO Corner

Twitter: JDSCIO

11

Isaac Sacolick

VP, Technology, McGraw-Hill

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Isaac Sacolick

Blog:  Social, Agile, & Transformation

Twitter: nyike

15

Steve Francia

CIO, Portero

Industry:  Retail

LinkedIn:  Steve Francia

Blog:  spf13

Twitter: spf13

15

Tony Maro

CIO for EvriChart

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Tony Maro

Blog:  OssRamblings.com

Twitter: tonymaro

15

Mark A. Silver

CIO, Health Svcs Div., Siemens Healthcare USA

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Mark A. Silver

Blog:  Social Media and Business Insights    
Twitter:
MarkSilver

15

Jim Haughwout

CIO, Neighborhood America (Florida)

Industry:  Consumer Services

LinkedIn:  Jim Haughwout

Blog:  Ex·se·cu·tus

Twitter: JHaughwout

19

Brian Blanchard

Chairman at St. Louis Innovation Camp

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Brian Blanchard

Blog:  Dev Revival

Twitter: BrianBlanchard

19

Chuck Hollis

VP and CTO of Marketing, EMC

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
Chuck's blog

Twitter: chuckhollis

19

Hubert Vaudaux

CTO at FBA (www.groupefb.fr)

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Hubert Vaudaux

Blog:  HVaudaux Le Blog 
Twitter:
hvaudaux

19

Bill Schrier

CTO, City of Seattle

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Bill Schrier

Blog:  The Chief Seattle Geek Blog

Twitter: billschrier

23

Casey Coleman

CIO, U.S. General Services Administration

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Casey Coleman

Blog:  Around the Corner

Twitter: caseycoleman

23

Linda Cureton

CIO, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Linda Cureton

Blog:  Goddard-CIO-Blog

Twitter: Curetonl

23

Mike Schaffner

Dir. IT, Cameron

Industry:  Oil & Gas

LinkedIn:  Mike Schaffner

Blog:  Beyond Blinking Lights and Acronyms

Twitter: MikeSchaffner

26

John McMillen

CIO, Graves County Schools in Mayfield, KY, USA

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  John D McMillen

Blog:  Techucation

Twitter: ujdmc

26

Peter Kretzman

CIO/CTO

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Peter Kretzman

Blog:  CTO/CIO Perspectives

Twitter: PeterKretzman

26

Nigel Fortlage

VP, IT at GHY International

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Nigel Fortlage

Blog:  My Thoughts

Twitter: nfortlage

26

Arun Manansingh

CIO, FusionLatina, LLC

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Arun Manansingh

Blog:  A CiO’s Voice

Twitter: solus72

30

Colin Osburn

CIO at Intelligentz Corporation

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Colin Osburn

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
colinosburn

30

Will Weider

CIO, Affinity Health System

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Will Weider

Blog:  Candid CIO

Twitter: CandidCIO

32

Lev Gonick

VP, IT Services, Case Western Reserve Univ.

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  Lev Gonick

Blog:  Bytes From Lev

Twitter: lgonick

32

Ian Cohen

CIO, Jardine Lloyd Thompson plc

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Ian Cohen

Blog:  The Accidental CIO

Twitter: coe62

34

Paul Cheesbrough

CIO, Telegraph Media Group

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Paul Cheesbrough

Blog:  Paul Cheesbrough

Twitter: paulcheesbrough

34

Stephen Gillett

CIO & GM of Digital Ventures, Starbucks

Industry:  Retail

LinkedIn:  Stephen Gillett

Blog:  The Guild CIO

Twitter: @stephengillett

36

Eric Egnet

CIO, Vitalize Consuilting Solutions

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Eric Egnet

Blog:  In The Know CIO

Twitter: InTheKnowCIO

36

Omri Tintpulver

CIO, Brunico Communications

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn: Omri Tintpulver

Blog:  Omri Tintpulver

Twitter: omri

36

John Suffolk

CIO, UK government

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  John Suffolk

Blog:  John Suffolk – Government CIO

Twitter: GovCIO

39

Chris Marsh

CIO, Aviacode

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Chris Marsh

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
theChrisMarsh

39

Katherine Coomb

CIO, Morrison Facilities Services

Industry:  Services

LinkedIn:  Katherine Coomb

Blog:  Banking on IT

Twitter: kat_woman

41

Vivek Kundra

CIO, US government

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Vivek Kundra

Blog:  IT Dashboard

Twitter: VivekKundra

41

Dr. Andy Chun

CIO, City University of Hong Kong

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Andy Chun

Blog:  CIO's Blog

Twitter: CityUCIO

41

Eachan Fletcher

CIO, Sporting Index

Industry:  Leisure

LinkedIn:  Eachan Fletcher

Blog:  The Fletcher Project

Twitter: n/a

44

Victor Fetter

Global VP, Dell

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Victor Fetter

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
vpfetter

44

Peter Birley

IT Dir., Brown Jacobson, LLP

Industry:  Legal

LinkedIn:  Peter Birley

Blog:  CIO blog

Twitter: birlep

44

Robert Carey

CIO, U.S. Navy

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
doncio

Twitter: n/a

47

Janet Claggett

CIO, Richland County, S.C.

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Janet Claggett

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
cio007

48

Steve Mannina

CIO Cook County Treasure's office

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Steve Mannina

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
smannina

48

Scott Lowe

CIO, Westminster College (Fulton, Mo.)

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  Scott Lowe

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
scottdlowe

48

R. Todd Thomas

CIO, Austin Radiological Association

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  R. Todd Thomas

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
thomast360

As you look through the list, you will see that there are more than a fair share of CIOs from Healthcare & Government on the list.  I’m not sure why, but that could be a question for further research.

2009 CIO Award Winners Are Not Embracing Social Media

CO261 I’ve been doing some research to support an article I am writing for an upcoming post to InfoBOOM on the topic of CIOs and the Social Media.   My article will provide some thoughts on what CIOs should be doing this year to begin to leverage the social computing trend.  That article will appear on InfoBOOM in mid March.

One of the things I was curious to find out was whether or not CIOs were embracing the public side of the social media trend.  I wanted to see if I could find evidence of CIOs, CTOs, and IT leaders who were participating in the public social networks.  Are there CIOs out there that are actively engaging in conversations and providing though leadership on topics that are important to CIOs?   So far I have found about 50 of them that are blogging, tweeting, and connecting on social sites. I will post that list in the next day or two as I finish my research, so watch for that post.

As I did this research, I decided to take a look at some of the CIO and IT leaders who received awards in 2009 to see if they had embraced the public side of social media. Every year, there are a number of organizations that hand out awards to top CIOs and IT leaders, each with slightly different criteria.  The question I was asking was were these award winners actively participating in the public discussions on topics that are important to CIOs and IT Leaders? 

So I picked two 2009 award lists and researched the award winners on each list.

  1. The CIO Leadership Network’s 2009 Top 10 Leaders & Change Agents Award honored CIOs and senior IT executives “whose innovative responses to changing business needs have provided outstanding leadership in global IT management and have brought demonstrable business benefit to their organizations”.  
  2. The CIO.com 2009 Ones to Watch Awards honored 25 “rising stars in IT—the senior staff destined to become the CIOs of the future—as identified and sponsored by the CIOs of today's leading organizations”.

I performed online searches of the 35 award winners to see if I could find evidence that they were participating in the public social media.  I looked for evidence that they were blogging, tweeting, commenting, or otherwise posting content that was being consumed in the social media. 

Of the 35 award winners, I could find no evidence that anyone was blogging or commenting on others blogs.  Only two of these award winners have Twitter IDs and both of them are not actively using Twitter.  It was encouraging to find that 29 out of the 35 did have profiles set up on LinkedIn, however, most of those profiles were lacking content.   I found less than half of them were on Facebook.

While I understand that blogging and tweeting might not be everyone’s ‘cup of tea’, I would have hoped I would find more of these award winners actively participating online and adding their voice to public conversations happening about subjects important to the IT industry.  There’s so much we could be learning from these award winners…and so much they could be learning as well. 

The social computing trend is a very significant trend that is quickly crossing over from the consumer market to enterprises.  Our future CIOs and IT leaders need to be embracing the social computing trend in order to understand it’s impact on business processes and the potential value it can bring to the enterprise. 

I’d like to see a higher percentage of these award winners experimenting with social media and sharing their thoughts on the future of the IT industry and the role of the CIO.

Leveraging Social Media: 12 Steps To Develop Your Personal Online Brand

12 steps to manage your personal online brand Do you have a plan on how to leverage the social media trend in order to achieve your career objectives?

Are you taking part in the online conversations that are happening on the topics that are important to you and the development of your career?  Or are you on the sidelines when it comes to participating in online communities, social networks, etc?   

If you are not part of the conversations that are important to your career, you can’t learn from those conversations.  Nor can you influence those conversations.  And in the future when potential employers look online to see if you have participated, they will not see you.

You are responsible for how you are perceived online. If you are not managing your online brand, then it is being shaped for you (perhaps by those pictures your friends are posting on Facebook).  

The following 12 steps can help you take control of your online personal brand.

  1. Document Your Career Goals.  Have a balance of short term and long term goals.  For each goal, think about how participating in online communities and social networks could help you achieve those goals. 
  2. Document Your Top 4-5 Career Related Topics.   These are the most important topic domains that you need to master in order to become an authoritative source of information a subject matter expert for the duration of your career.   Think about the topics that you can remain passionate about for a long time.
  3. Analyze Your Existing Social Network And Online Presence. How does your current social network and online presence align with your documented goals?  How can you build stronger ties and increase your ability to learn? 
  4. Master The Online Productivity Tools.  You need to have a good foundation in order to maximize your ability to collaborate online.  These new social tools can help your collaboration efforts be more productive.  Spend time educating yourself on how to use Twitter, Facebook, blogging, etc. 
  5. Research / Collect Information.  Learn where the online sources are for information related to your 4-5 main career topics.  Visit these sites often.  Collect and maintain a master folder of documents, resources, Web links, etc., which have been helpful to you.  You will want this for step 11 below.
  6. Document Where The Buzz Is Online.  Check out my social-search bookmarks on delicious and learn how to search the social media.  Search on each of your 4-5 career topics you listed in step 2 above.  Document where the online conversations are happening for those topics.   Document who are the most influential online people.  Find out where those influential people are hanging out online.  Maintain a list of URLs (suggest you book them on delicious).
  7. Join Online Communities.  For the topics that are important to your career goals, join the most active online communities, groups, and networks.  Connect with and then ask members where else they connect with like-minded people.
  8. Move Your Conversations Online.  For the topics that are important to your career goals, cut down on email conversations and increase your online conversations in those places you’ve identified above.
  9. Manage Your Personal Online Brand.  Take control of your virtual online presence.   Establish and keep all your profile(s) updated.  Make sure that when people look for you online…which they will…information about you is current and accurate.  Your effort here is all about helping you achieve the goals documented in step 1 above.
  10. Connect With The Community Champions.  ‘Friend’ the most active people in the online communities that are important to your career objectives.  Connect with them on LinkedIn and Twitter.   Follow their blogs, tweets, and community posts.  Post replies to their blogs and retweet their Tweets.  Share insights with them and point them to your online content.
  11. Share Your Knowledge Wealth.  For the communities you have joined, increase your online conversations.  Post comments in discussion forums and on blog posts.  Share your bookmarks.  Share the insights and opinions you’ve formed as a result of your efforts in documenting where the online buzz is.  Save time by organizing your centralizing all of your thoughts on each topic area into document templates with URL links to those sites, blog posts, etc., that you feel are the most important.
  12. Establish Yourself As An On-line Authority.  Establish and maintain a presence on all sites where your 4-5 career topics are being discussed.  Be a visible and active participant in the most important communities.  For the topics that matter most to your career, establish your own online site/blogs/communities.  Link to other authoritative blogs and communities often and continue sharing your insights and opinions on those sites as well as developing your own site.

Don’t sit idle on the sidelines. Take responsibility for your future and get involved in the online conversations happening about the topics you are passionate about.  You have important ideas to share with the rest of us.  We will all learn from your experience, thoughts, and content.

IBM and SeeClickFix: A Social Collaboration Challenge on the Smarter Cities Scan

seeclickfix challenge

Are you aware of some non-emergency issues going on in your community that if fixed that could help improve the quality of life in your town?  Some examples might be:

  • A dangerous intersection for pedestrians
  • A bike lane that is always blocked
  • An area that always floods whenever it rains
  • A building with broken windows
  • A vacant lot that needs to be cleaned up
  • Potholes on a certain street that never get fixed
  • Cracked sidewalks that need to be fixed
  • Unsafe activity going on in your neighborhood

The SeeClickFix Challenge:

There’s a very interesting crowdsourcing effort going on I thought you might be interested in checking out.  The folks at SeeClickFix have partnered up with IBM’s Smarter Cities Scan in an effort called the “SeeClickFix Challenge on the Smarter Cities Scan”

SeeClickFix empowers residents to actively care for and improve their neighborhoods by engaging them to report on things they think needs to be ‘fixed’ by posting information of those things on the web.  Residents pinpoint the exact location on a map and can upload pictures of the problem.  The IBM Smarter Cities Scan team recognized this service as a novel approach to help us all improve the cities we live in.  So the two teams are now partnering in this unique social collaboration challenge.  The crowdsourcing effort will run from February 8-21 on the Smarter Cities Scan.   And you can participate!

How You Can Participate:

  1. See – spot a non-emergency issue in your neighborhood, go to http://seeclickfix.com/citizens and enter your city name to begin the process
  2. Click – “Report an Issue” to open a ticket describing the issue and what can be done to resolve it
  3. Fix  – Monitor your ticket and the issue you reported to see how your city responded.
  4. Share – Go back to the Smarter Cities Scan site and report on your SeeClickFix experience by sharing your SeeClickFix story.   We want to understand how citizens and  communities put SeeClickFix to new uses in all urban environments.  In the process perhaps we can generate some new ideas on how to make our cities better places to live in.  So please share your story!!

I just entered my first ‘problem’ into the SeeClickFix database for my community and found the process easy.  There’s a walking/bike path in my community that needs repairing in a certain spot.  It is not paved and doesn’t drain well…so it gets all muddy.  The path is just a few feet from a 50mph road and I am worried some runner or biker will slip and fall into traffic. 

Want More Information?

Spread The News!

The more people we have contributing stories, the more we all learn in the process.  Help publicize this collaboration challenge to your social networks via email, Facebook, and Twitter (use tag #seeclickfix).  And If you blog, consider authoring a post about this challenge as I have done here.