Friday Gadget: Concepts for Future Glass Display Applications

I took a few weeks off from Friday Gadget posts as I was on my spring break with my family.  This week I am back with a post the future of displays.

The post today features a concept video from Corning Glass that is actually a couple of years old.  The video is a montage from its “A Day Made of Glass” series of videos that they created in 2011 and 2012.   Even though the video montage I am sharing below was made a couple of years ago, it is very, very relevant today.  The video provides us with a fantastic view of the potential futures of applications that involve glass displays.    Even if you have seen the videos, its worth another look. 

The video was produced to share Corning’s vision on how glass will help create a more connected, collaborative, and interactive world.  The video features a family of four going about a “normal day,” aided by glass-pane tablets and touchscreen walls. But the latest video reveals an even broader view of the role specialty glass could play in the “near future,” reaching out of the home and into hospitals, schools, even parks.

The video is embedded below and is 5 minutes in length.  I guarantee it is worth the time.  It will really get you thinking about how we might interact with information in the future.  As you watch the video, think about the emerging “3rd” computing platform that is made up of technologies like big data, analytics, data visualization, cloud computing, social business, mobile computing, wearables, internet of things, cognitive computing, and human computer interaction.  The video does a great job of showing how all those technologies, when fully integrated into solutions and services, can make a significant impact in our lives.

Corning is, of course, very much focused on selling the future of glass.  Their stated vision is “Interactive glass surfaces, seamless delivery of real-time information, and technologies that enrich your life”.  The company creates and makes specialty glasses that are critical components within the concept products shown in the videos.   The vivid displays, durable touch surfaces, or instant, real-time communications shown in the videos, each require some form of specialty glass.   Learn more about Corning’s innovations in glass.

Friday Gadget: Rapport Device Detects and Reacts to Human Emotions

I’ve decided to bring back the Friday Gadget posts after a very long absence. 

I am not really a gadget guy, but I do like to think about what types of products future generations will have that will make their life easier and think about how emerging technologies will be a part of our lives in the future. When I first started blogging back in 2006, every Friday I would post about a concept for a future technology or gadget.   The series of posts were designed to help us all take a step back on a Friday, have a little fun, and help us all imagine how technology can disrupt the future. 

So I am bringing back the Friday Gadget posts.  I am not sure how long the series will last this time, but we will have fun with it while it lasts…

For this first new post , I found a project team that asked the question:  What if your gadgets knew how you were feeling and could then respond appropriately?   A group of designers developed a device they call Rapport that can observe, analyze and react to your facial expressions in order to select a music playlist that suits you the best.  Once you make eye contact with the device, it leans forward and analyzes your facial expression. Taking into account the time of day, it selects a song that it feels might suit your current mood.   The Rapport device starts the playback of the song at a fairly low volume, but will boost the volume if it sees you smiling or excited.

Under the covers, the team utilized 4 different software programs including Visual Studio (stores the facial recognition library and eye tracking code), Processing (runs the facial recognition library), Max/Msp(controls volume and curates music) and Arduino (drives the stepper motors inside the device).

Potential initial applications could include smart homes, retirement homes, entertainment events, and education.  In the future, application developers will utilize emotion detection systems to design robots that understand how better to interact with humans.   Over time robots could learn to understand how different humans react emotionally and treat each person differently based on both visual and auditory inputs. 

For more, check out these resources:   1) Rapport Introduction (Youtube), 2) Rapport Demonstration (YouTube), 3) Emotional Intelligence (Yanko Design), 4) Feeling the Music;  Gadget Reads Emotions to Choose Songs (Gajitz)

Cognitive Computing Trend and Prediction Articles for 2014

We are fast-approaching a new era of computing called cognitive computing. Cognitive computing systems will learn, interact and adapt naturally to support consumers, knowledge workers and business decision makers. This new computing era is not an incremental change. It will disrupt industries and how work gets performed within those industries. It signifies a fundamental shift in how machines interact with us and the environment.

I recently published my trend report  Cognitive Computing Trends to Watch in 2014.   The report provides an overview of Cognitive Computing and what to watch in 2014 in related topics like IBM Watson, Artificial Intelligence, and Smart Machines.   In the deck, I provide  important trends and predictions about Cognitive Computing trends in 2014.

Below I’ve provided you some articles on this trend that I thought you would want to read.


Source Title
The Economist Group The machine of a new soul
BGR What might finally take Siri to the next level? You.
IPWatchdog What is a Computer?
opus Research 10 Trends to Watch: Conversational Commerce 2014
inside BigData A Look Ahead at Big Data and Cognitive Computing
Wired Innovation Insights Artificial Intelligence Set to Deliver ‘Wow’
CSC Becoming a Believer in Artificial Intelligence
New York Times Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience
IBM Bringing Cognitive Computing to the Enterprise
The Bridge Cognition-as-a-Service will be big in 2014

 

Gartner Top Ten Strategic Trends for 2014

Gartner top-10-strategic-trends-2014-gartnerIn case you missed it, Gartner recently announced their latest revision to their strategic technologies list.   The revised list is announced annually at the Gartner Symposium/ITxpo in Orlando.  This post provides an overview of the trends on Gartner’s list of Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2014.  The ten are all very important, but I wonder why Big Data, Analytics, and Social are not mentioned.  Regarding #9 Smart Machines, I think we are a few years away from seeing a smart machine market fully develop, but when cognitive systems do go mainstream, the impact will be highly disruptive across all business processes and enterprise applications.

1) Mobile Device Diversity.   Gartner says the explosion of mobile devices and user interfaces will make “everything everywhere” strategies unachievable from now through 2018.  Bring your own device (BYOD) programs have caused IT and Finance organizations a bunch of stress.   Gartner recommends a complete review of BYOD programs to better define expectations and to balance flexibility with confidentiality and privacy requirements.

2) Mobile Apps & Applications.  Gartner says HTML5 and mobile browsers will be the focus of enterprise application development.   Developers should focus on improving the user interface via richer voice and video in order to connect people in new and different ways.   It’s like a gold rush era for creating apps for all different and we should not expect any consolidation to happen soon.

3) The Internet of Everything.   Internet of Things (IoT) is now increasingly being referred to as the Internet of Everything (IoE).  Sensors and devices are increasingly being embedded into all sorts of enterprise assets and consumer items.    Gartner says that most organizations have not yet fully grasped the potential of IoE and not operationally or organizationally ready.   Gartner identifies four basic usage models that are emerging:  Manage, Monetize, Operate, Extend and recommends these four basic models should be applied to any of the four “internets” (people, things, information and places).

4) Hybrid Cloud and IT as Service Broker.   Gartner says the future of cloud computing are hybrid clouds.  This is an environment where clouds can talk to each other.  So enterprises should design private cloud services fro the ground up so that full integration/interoperability is possible. 

5) Cloud / Client Architecture.  Gartner says that cloud and client computing models are shifting.  In the future cloud and client architecture, the client is a rich application running on an Internet-connected device, and the server is a set of application services hosted in an increasingly elastically scalable cloud computing platform. The cloud is the control point and system, and applications can span multiple client devices.

6) The Era of the Personal Cloud.   Gartner says that there is a shift in importance coming away from personal devices and towards personal cloud services.   Users will use a collection of internet connected devices.   The personal cloud and the applications we all run as individuals will become the core control point.

7) Software Defined Everything (SDx).   Gartner sees an increased role for software in the datacenter.   Software is now able to data center more hardware more efficiently and easily than ever imagined before.  With Software-Defined Everything, the computing infrastructure is virtualized and delivered as a service.  Gartner says there is growing market momentum for improved standards for infrastructure programmability and data center interoperability driven by desires to implement cloud computing, DevOps and fast infrastructure provisioning.

8) Web Scale IT.  Gartner says that large cloud services providers such as Amazon, Google, Salesforce.com, and others are re-inventing the way in which IT services can be delivered.  Gartner recommends that IT organizations should align with and emulate the processes, architectures, and practices of these leading cloud providers.

9) Smarter Machines.  Gartner suggests that the “the smart machine era will be the most disruptive in the history of IT”.  Gartner further predicts that “Through 2020, the smart machine era will blossom with a proliferation of contextually aware, intelligent personal assistants, smart advisors (such as IBM Watson), advanced global industrial systems and public availability of early examples of autonomous vehicles.   Gartner says that the market for smart machines will include solutions like

  • contextually aware, intelligent personal assistants
  • smart advisors
  • advanced global industrial systems
  • autonomous vehicles

10) 3D Printing.  According to Gartner, 3D printing is not just for printing toys and jewelry.  Gartner says that 3D printing will have a high impact on many industries, including consumer products, industrial and manufacturing.   Gartner is predicting that shipments of 3-D printers will grow 75 percent in 2014 and 200 percent in 2015.

For more, check out the press release here or attend the December 13 Webinar

IBM Research’s “5 in 5” list for 2012 Features Cognitive Computing

5 in 5 Every year about this time, IBM Research has been publishing an annual list called “Next 5 in 5” which provides predictions about five emerging technologies that IBM feels will impact our lives in five years.

Today IBM released it’s list for this year and it features an enabling and emerging technology called cognitive computing.

This year’s “Next 5 in 5” cover how computers will enhance the human senses of  Sight, Touch, Hearing, Smell and Taste.    A brief summary of the five predictions are below, along with links to more detail.

  1. Sight: A pixel will be worth a thousand words. There is a lot of work going on in that area of visualization and imaging analytics technology.  IBM says that computers will be able to analyze and act upon large volumes of visual streams of information to help us make better decisions.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Sight
  2. Touch:  You will be able to touch through your phone.  Imagine being able to feel the texture in fabric over a mobile screen.  IBM Research says that haptic, infrared, and vibration technologies will enable a touchscreen to simulate the physical sensation of touching something.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012:  Touch
  3. Hearing: Computers will hear what matters.   IBM says that embedded sensors will pick up sound patterns and frequency changes and then advanced algorithms embedded in apps will be able to understand and predict events before they occur….allowing for better decisions and communications in real-time.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Hearing
  4. Smell: Computers will have a sense of smell.   In the future, sensors in a smartphone will be able to detect and distinguish different odors.  Mobile apps will be able to analyze these odors (chemicals, biomarkers, molecules) and provide insights and recommendations back to the smartphone user.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Smell
  5. Taste: Digital taste buds will help you eat smarter.   IBM Research says that in the future computers will be able to develop new recipes and meals by using a the molecular structure of foods to optimize flavors and nutrition.   Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Taste

In my mind…the list represents an interesting set of predictions foreshadowing how in the future 1) computers will be able to give people back senses they may have lost (or never had) and 2) robots will have the ability to simulate human senses.  However, there are many other potential applications of the technologies that we can imagine that will benefit corporations, governments, and consumers.  For example, firemen responding to a fire in a manufacturing plant will have mobile devices that help them understand if there are any toxic gases.  Police departments will be able to listen for patterns in gang neighborhoods to anticipate when and where skirmishes might happen. Automobiles will have embedded capability on board to detect problems with the engine based on sound patterns.  Consumers shopping online will be able to ‘touch’ the fabric of of a sweater before buying.

For more information…