Cognitive Computing Trend and Prediction Articles for 2014

We are fast-approaching a new era of computing called cognitive computing. Cognitive computing systems will learn, interact and adapt naturally to support consumers, knowledge workers and business decision makers. This new computing era is not an incremental change. It will disrupt industries and how work gets performed within those industries. It signifies a fundamental shift in how machines interact with us and the environment.

I recently published my trend report  Cognitive Computing Trends to Watch in 2014.   The report provides an overview of Cognitive Computing and what to watch in 2014 in related topics like IBM Watson, Artificial Intelligence, and Smart Machines.   In the deck, I provide  important trends and predictions about Cognitive Computing trends in 2014.

Below I’ve provided you some articles on this trend that I thought you would want to read.


Source Title
The Economist Group The machine of a new soul
BGR What might finally take Siri to the next level? You.
IPWatchdog What is a Computer?
opus Research 10 Trends to Watch: Conversational Commerce 2014
inside BigData A Look Ahead at Big Data and Cognitive Computing
Wired Innovation Insights Artificial Intelligence Set to Deliver ‘Wow’
CSC Becoming a Believer in Artificial Intelligence
New York Times Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience
IBM Bringing Cognitive Computing to the Enterprise
The Bridge Cognition-as-a-Service will be big in 2014

 

IBM Research’s “5 in 5” list for 2012 Features Cognitive Computing

5 in 5 Every year about this time, IBM Research has been publishing an annual list called “Next 5 in 5” which provides predictions about five emerging technologies that IBM feels will impact our lives in five years.

Today IBM released it’s list for this year and it features an enabling and emerging technology called cognitive computing.

This year’s “Next 5 in 5” cover how computers will enhance the human senses of  Sight, Touch, Hearing, Smell and Taste.    A brief summary of the five predictions are below, along with links to more detail.

  1. Sight: A pixel will be worth a thousand words. There is a lot of work going on in that area of visualization and imaging analytics technology.  IBM says that computers will be able to analyze and act upon large volumes of visual streams of information to help us make better decisions.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Sight
  2. Touch:  You will be able to touch through your phone.  Imagine being able to feel the texture in fabric over a mobile screen.  IBM Research says that haptic, infrared, and vibration technologies will enable a touchscreen to simulate the physical sensation of touching something.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012:  Touch
  3. Hearing: Computers will hear what matters.   IBM says that embedded sensors will pick up sound patterns and frequency changes and then advanced algorithms embedded in apps will be able to understand and predict events before they occur….allowing for better decisions and communications in real-time.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Hearing
  4. Smell: Computers will have a sense of smell.   In the future, sensors in a smartphone will be able to detect and distinguish different odors.  Mobile apps will be able to analyze these odors (chemicals, biomarkers, molecules) and provide insights and recommendations back to the smartphone user.  Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Smell
  5. Taste: Digital taste buds will help you eat smarter.   IBM Research says that in the future computers will be able to develop new recipes and meals by using a the molecular structure of foods to optimize flavors and nutrition.   Read more at IBM 5 in 5 2012: Taste

In my mind…the list represents an interesting set of predictions foreshadowing how in the future 1) computers will be able to give people back senses they may have lost (or never had) and 2) robots will have the ability to simulate human senses.  However, there are many other potential applications of the technologies that we can imagine that will benefit corporations, governments, and consumers.  For example, firemen responding to a fire in a manufacturing plant will have mobile devices that help them understand if there are any toxic gases.  Police departments will be able to listen for patterns in gang neighborhoods to anticipate when and where skirmishes might happen. Automobiles will have embedded capability on board to detect problems with the engine based on sound patterns.  Consumers shopping online will be able to ‘touch’ the fabric of of a sweater before buying.

For more information…