Social Business Trends and Prediction Articles for 2014

When implemented successfully, social collaboration technologies connect people to other people, both within an enterprise and externally across enterprises. When people get connected digitally, it strengthens the relationships those people have with each other. And it increases the productivity of those people relative to the business transactions they are conducting.

I recently published my trend report  Social Business Trends to Watch in 2014.   The report provides an overview of Social Business and what sub-trends to watch in 2014.

Below I’ve provided you a list of 10 articles that I thought you might be interested in

Source Title
AIIM 2014: The Year Collaboration Goes Social through People
Altimeter Group 2014 Trends: Organizing Around the Social Customer
MindlinkSoft What’s next for business collaboration? Six Trends emerging in 2014
Colligo  Top 5 Mobile Collaboration Predictions For 2014
Altimeter Group Infographic: State of Social Business 2013 and Outlook for 2014
NMK Workplace collaboration technology to mature in 2014
Clara Shih (hearsay Social) Big Idea 2014: Social Business Grows Up
Forbes 2014:  The Year Social HR Matters
Jim Whitehurst Big Idea 2014: Collaborative Innovation Shaping and Changing Our World
View Do Labs Enterprise Social 2014 Predictions

You can download my report via slideshare.

Enterprise IT Security Trends and Prediction Articles for 2014

Security is one of those long term trends that just continues to grow in importance and size. Information security professionals face the challenge of detecting an ever increasing number of threats.

Consumerization, social, mobile, cloud, big data and IoT are all contributing an increased risk of security and data breaches . The data center is more vulnerable than ever. New threats emerge daily and even hourly and we hear reports of major attacks daily on the nightly news.

I recently published my trend report Enterprise IT Security Trends To Watch In 2014 out on slideshare.  This  trend report provides an overview of Enterprise Information Technology Trends to Watch in 2014.

Below I’ve provided you some articles on this trend that I thought you would want to read.

Source Title
Channel Pro Cybersecurity: The landscape in 2014
Trusteer The Most Dangerous Malware Trends for 2014
Information Age 8 cyber security predictions for 2014
ZDNet Cybersecurity in 2014: A roundup of predictions
PCWorld Security prediction for 2014: It will get worse
PerspecSys Cloud Security – 5 Predictions of What We’ll See in 2014
Enterprise Networking Planet 5 Network Security Predictions for 2014
Real Business 14 IT security predictions for 2014
Info Security Top 13 Cyber Security predictions for 2014…
Cisco Our Unofficial Top Ten Cyber Trends for 2014

 

My Thoughts on the Cloud Computing Trend

Last month I posted "IBM Cloud Computing White Papers".  In that post I provide summaries and links to a number of white papers IBM has posted on the Cloud Computing topic. 

SWSC16 As I mention in that post, I did a bunch of research on the topic of Cloud Computing back in late 2007 and 2008.  The post last month gave me the opportunity to reflect on the cloud computing trend.  In 2008 it was an emerging buzzword in the IT industry.  Today, 2 years later, the concept is a little more defined and the hype has died down a bit. 

Yes, there is more that needs to happen before the true potential of cloud computing becomes a reality, but there is no question that we all need to pay attention to the vision of cloud computing…because cloud computing (or whatever it ends up being called) is the future of the IT industry. 

Why you ask?  There are a number of reasons.  But primary in my mind is that it offers businesses the promise of business agility.   Agility enables the business to respond quickly to customer requests for new products and services.  It also allows businesses to partner more quickly to reach new markets faster.  And it also allows businesses to quickly change in the face of competition.  Here are some basic reasons why the cloud computing concept will take off.

  • Economics: Clouds will require a very small up front investment.  Usage will be be billed by consumption.  The resulting reduction in Total Cost of Ownership will allow businesses to pursue improvements in operational efficiency and productivity.
  • Risk Management:  In some cases, there will be no fixed time commitment.  This will allow businesses to try many new services faster.  This reduces big failure risks and allows clients to be innovative.
  • Time to Market:  Businesses will be able to adopt new services quickly for pilot usages and then scale quickly to a global scale.
  • Information Society:  Cloud computing will provide business executives value-added information generated by the collection and analysis of massive amounts of unstructured data.
  • Ubiquitous Society:  The cloud treats all devices the same making the cloud accessible via a heterogeneous set of devices (sensors, kiosks, PC, mobile device, telematics..)

In today's fast world, new competitors, with innovative business models (e.g. Google, Amazon, etc.), seem to be able to rapidly change their business.  To match these types of competitors, businesses must have a business architecture and an IT infrastructure that is flexible enough to respond quickly to all opportunities and threats.  The emerging cloud computing concept enables businesses to become more agile because it offers the ability to get to market quickly, and with a lower capital expense.  It also assures that as demand increases, resources can be added incrementally, without the need for major architecture changes.

From an IT standpoint, business agility implies the ability to rapidly build and configure tailored solutions which span internal and external systems.  Cloud computing can enable the development of applications in real-time and then also enables them to be quickly deployed globally to any device from sensors to mobile device to PCs.  Once developed, Line of Business executives need those applications to execute in real-time, scaling to meet the needs of the business.   Follow on generations of applications must be able to handle increasingly higher amounts of data as the user base grows.  Once running, applications in the cloud offer non stop operation.  Users aren't burdened by HW and SW upgrades.  

In the future, there will be all sorts of new types of services enabled because of computing clouds.  Services we can''t even imagine right now.  The fact is that the more applications and services that are deployed in the cloud, the more opportunities there are to leverage services provided by others in the same or other clouds.

The biggest 'hurdles' to realizing the vision of cloud computing is security, privacy, & risk Management issues.  These issues can be HUGE to overcome.  The security issues will be very complex to solve and a number of the white papers I summarized in the post "IBM Cloud Computing White Papers" discuss those security issues.

I do believe that we will solve the 'hurdles' and businesses will learn to trust running our systems in the 'clouds'.   Remember the initial fear you had of buying things online with your credit card?  I bet you do that now with much less fear.  Perhaps you don't even think about it.

Anyway, Cloud Computing is a disruptive force in the Information Technology industry and it is one of the trends I will continue to watch closely.

IDC Insights: Manufacturing Product Life Cycle Management 2010 Predictions

IDC PLM 2010 Predictions About a week or so ago I attended the IDC Manufacturing Insights conference call where IDC outlined its 2010 Predictions for Product Life Cycle Management.  On the call Joe Barkai, IDC PLM Practice Director and  Benjamin Friedman, IDC PLM Research Manager took the conference call attendees through IDC’s predictions and trends for the Manufacturing PLM market.

Here’s my summary of IDCs top trends in PLM

  1. Innovation and Business Alignment.  In 2010, IDC says there will be an increased focus on aligning PLM innovation with business strategy, making sure innovation is ‘productive’ and is helping the company achieve growth.
  2. Enterprise PLM is Maturing.  IDC is saying that PLM is becoming an important factor in the entire enterprise decision-making discipline, but more progress is needed to integrate all manufacturing systems across the organization.
  3. Socializing” Product Development:   Social computing has had an impact in marketing and support.  In 2010, we should all expect the social computing trend to have an impact on product development. Innovative firms will figure this out in 2010.
  4. Rising Demand for PLM Value:  IDC says that in 2010, PLM vendors need to demonstrate value and relevance.  IDC is encouraging vendors to emphasize integration, interoperability and open source.
  5. Visualization for Better Decision-Making:  Decision makers need to see the information in new and different ways in order to help them make better decisions.  Expect an increasing emphasis on the importance of making sense of all the data collected and stored via advanced analytics and visualization tools. 
  6. Technical Content is Back.   IDC says there will be an effort by companies to introduce new technical related services and improve the quality of existing services as a way to differentiate their products.
  7. Factory of the Future.  Smarter and more intelligent manufacturing is a big trend.  IDC says to expect an increased interest by manufacturing companies in the area of intelligent factory networks that can “design anywhere, build anywhere, sell & service anywhere”. 
  8. Beyond Discrete Manufacturing.  IDC believes that PLM software can and will be implemented in some non-traditional areas, like process manufacturing, retail and consumer goods, and perhaps even financial services.  
  9. PLM in the Cloud.  IDC says adoption of enterprise cloud-based PLM solutions will slowly begin to take off.  All the right drivers are in place and many of the concerns are being resolved.
  10. M&As to Close Gaps.   IDC says that given the economic climate, some firms will take the opportunity to merge and / or acquire other firms in order to build scale and/or access new markets.

Personally, I’d like to see a lot of focus on prediction number 3.  I don’t see many firms leveraging social computing yet as a way to innovate the product development process.

The webinar was recorded and you can check it out by going to IDC Insights Predictions 2010: Manufacturing Product Lifecycle Management (registration required).

For more information,

TripleTree: Collaboration, Communities, & The Extended Enterprise

I’ve been interested this year in understanding how the disruptive social computing trend will impact business processes, workflows, and decision making processes.

Triple Tree, LCC recently released a report that caught my eye: Collaboration, Communities & the Extended Enterprise .  The report takes a look at the growth of collaboration tools and the emerging importance of these technologies on the future of enterprise application and infrastructure platforms.   For those of you selling the concept of embedding collaboration and communities into enterprise applications, I suggest you take some time to read the report.

For a quick view into the report, the major sections in the table of contents of the report are labeled

  • Growth Despite Fragmentation
  • Internal Collaboration
  • External Collaboration
  • Collaboration Platforms
  • Users Prefer Less Fragmented Approaches
  • The Powerful Differentiation of Communities
  • Other Impacts on the Extended Enterprise
  • Cloud Compuiting

The premise of the report is that social computing will have significant impact on business processes.  Tripletree says that as social features are applied to business computing solutions, it is increasingly important to understand the technical and organizational impact of collaboration platforms.  The report discusses how collaboration functions embedded into enterprise applications can improve user adoption and productivity while also enhancing business workflows.  Tripletree says that these embedded collaborative functions go beyond “just improving communications between knowledge workers and partners, and includes a growing appreciation for the importance of user-generated content, consumerism and transparency.”

In fact (and this is a very important point), TripleTree asserts that collaboration features will become the very core of every enterprise application suite and that business functionality will become a secondary part of the platform.  

The main takeaway of the report for application providers is that if you are not engineering  and embedding collaborative capabilities into solutions, you are telling the world you have decided to remain a legacy application vendor.

You can check out the report here  http://www.triple-tree.com/research/collaboration_q1_09.pdf

Tripletree also recently held a webcast on this topic. Slides and a mp3 replay are available.  Moderated by TripleTree, this webcast centered on a discussion and debate on the usefulness of collaboration and community-centric solutions, where user adoption is being influenced by consumerism, and how a Collaboration solution ROI can be measured through the lens of improved information management.  During the webcast, Tripletree introduced the topic and the report discussed above.  There were three panelists on the call, who each gave a short presentation on the topic of embedding collaboration capabilities into business processes.

  • Dan Carmel, CEO – SpringCM
  • Oren Michels, CEO – Mashery
  • Alex Van Deusen, Collaboration Specialist – Cisco WebEx

For more, check out the webcast Audio (MP3) and Slide Presentation (PDF)

Accenture on Enterprise Cloud Computing

Accenture has been relatively quiet the last 12 months on the subject of Cloud Computing….there's been relatively little from them on this important disruptive trend.   Searching their website, you really can't find much on the topic.  However, I see they have just published a brief on the topic titled  What the Enterprise Needs To Know About Cloud Computing .  The report is fairly basic, providing an overview of the trends, key drivers and inhibitors, along with some recommendations to CIOs. 

Here are some takeaways from the Accenture brief:

  • Accenture's definition of Cloud computing:  "the dynamic provisioning of IT capabilities (hardware, software or services) from third parties over a network"
  • Five Adoption Drivers: 
    1. Maturation of the Internet as an IT platform
    2. Virtualization
    3. Hardware commoditization
    4. Standardization
    5. Open source software
  • Five Obstacles
    1. Security in a shared third-party environment
    2. Data location, compliance and integration issues
    3. Lack of Service-level guarantees
    4. Legacy systems not tied in yet
    5. Procurement not ready for cloud computing
  • Three Steps CIOs should take:
    1. Use the cloud for the right jobs. Accenture recommends public clouds like Amazon EC2 as an inexpensive and flexible alternative.  It says it EC2 and those like it are mature enough for non-business-critical projects including research and development and software development and testing.  Accenture also says that the EC2 and like public clouds are also well suited for computation-intensive jobs such as data cleansing, data mining, risk modeling, optimization and simulation.
    2. Target the right users for cloud applications. Accenture says to switch some workers to lower-cost, cloud-based solutions based on the type of work they do.  It says to consider contact centers and offshore locations.
    3. Take small steps toward an internal cloud.  Accenture says that CIOs should continue to focus on virtualization and datacenter consolidation initiatives and that these initiatives will eventually lead to internal cloud.

For the full brief, download What the Enterprise Needs To Know About Cloud Computing  

My take is that in 2009 we will see increased focus on private enterprise clouds.  This is a perfect time for IT departments to experiment with the cloud service delivery model.  The eventual end of the financial crisis and recession could be a significant lever in the adoption of Cloud Computing.   One of the major benefits of cloud is the agility it offers.  Application development and system provisioning can happen much faster with a cloud infrastructure, allowing business to deploy new capability faster than ever before.  As the recession ends and growth picks up, the companies with the fastest response to the reappearance of market opportunities will be the ones to benefit most—and they are likely to be the ones that are already experienced in deploying and exploiting Cloud solutions.