Social Business Trends and Prediction Articles for 2014

When implemented successfully, social collaboration technologies connect people to other people, both within an enterprise and externally across enterprises. When people get connected digitally, it strengthens the relationships those people have with each other. And it increases the productivity of those people relative to the business transactions they are conducting.

I recently published my trend report  Social Business Trends to Watch in 2014.   The report provides an overview of Social Business and what sub-trends to watch in 2014.

Below I’ve provided you a list of 10 articles that I thought you might be interested in

Source Title
AIIM 2014: The Year Collaboration Goes Social through People
Altimeter Group 2014 Trends: Organizing Around the Social Customer
MindlinkSoft What’s next for business collaboration? Six Trends emerging in 2014
Colligo  Top 5 Mobile Collaboration Predictions For 2014
Altimeter Group Infographic: State of Social Business 2013 and Outlook for 2014
NMK Workplace collaboration technology to mature in 2014
Clara Shih (hearsay Social) Big Idea 2014: Social Business Grows Up
Forbes 2014:  The Year Social HR Matters
Jim Whitehurst Big Idea 2014: Collaborative Innovation Shaping and Changing Our World
View Do Labs Enterprise Social 2014 Predictions

You can download my report via slideshare.

31 Trend and Prediction Lists for Social Business in 2013

Social Business If you’ve been following this blog the last week, you know I am in the process of sharing back to you lists of trends and predictions I have uncovered while doing research on the top Technology trends for 2013.  I’ve inventoried over 500 different articles that discuss trends and predictions that might happen in 2013 related Technology.

Today I am providing you a list of 31 articles and blog posts that all discuss what trends to watch out for in the area of Social Business.  Included are articles on Social Media Marketing, Social CRM, and Internal vs. External Social Computing.  The Social trend is one of the major trends that is happening in enterprise businesses today.  It grew out of the Web 2.0 trend a few years ago and is a new way of doing business.  The important implication for business and IT leaders is that new business processes and skills are required.  And another thing….don’t underestimate the effort it requires to use social computing technologies.  It can be a large undertaking for a business to transform itself to a ‘social business’. 

So below you will find the list of articles and blog posts on the Social trend topic.  Come back over the next 10 days and you will find other related lists….

Source Title of Article / Blog Post
Brafton Social commerce: The real trend of 2013
Business Expo Center Creating a Social Business: Trends to Follow in 2013
Business2Community Seven Social Media Trends for 2013
Business2Community 2013 Blueprints: Social Media Marketing
Business2Community 14 Experts Predict 2013 Social Media Trends for Small Business
Clickz.com Corporate Social Media Marketing Strategy Checklist for 2013
CMSWire Social Business in 2013: A Challenge, An Opportunity, A Commitment
CMSWire 2013 Predictions: The Changing Needs of the Mobile, Social Business
CMSWire 2013 Prediction: Social Business Tech will Stop Blaming Culture for Failure
Dallas Business Journal 5 tips for setting social media strategy in 2013
Digitas Distillery Five Days of Digitas Predictions (for 2013): Social
Exchange4Media.com Higher growth, greater spends on social in 2013
Fast Company The Can’t-Miss Social Media Trends For 2013
Forbes Social Business: 5 Trends To Watch For 2013 And Beyond
Forbes Roundup of CRM Forecasts and Market Estimates, 2012
Forbes The 2013 Social Business Marketing Manifesto
Forbes Social Business: 5 Trends To Watch For 2013 And Beyond
Fresh Business Thinking Social Business Predictions For 2013
Gartner Gartner Outlines Six Best Practices for Moving to a Culture of Extreme Collaboration
HuffingtonPost Secrets to Success for Social Media in Business in 2013
IDC A Pivotal Year For Social Media In The Enterprise: ROI Drives Changes Across All Areas Of Social, Says IDC
PitchonNet Social Media: Trends Forecast for 2013
RealBusiness A look at social business in 2013
ResourceNation Top 10 Social Business Advances of 2012
Social Media Examiner 21 Social Media Predictions for 2013 from the Pros
Social Media Today Where Businesses Meet Social Media – Predictions for 2013
SocialMedia Today My Social Media Predictions for 2013
SocialMedia Today 5 Inbound and Social Media Predictions For 2013
Telligent Social business predictions for 2013
Tibbr 16 Enterprise Social Networking Predictions for 2013
VentureBeat How to take control of your company’s social destiny in 2013

Come back to this blog in the coming days and weeks for more insights on the important trends in technology.

Learning about the Social Business trend: Three IBM White Papers

I’ve written before about the social business trend and it’s impact on businesses (see The Social Business Train Is Leaving The Station Are You On It? and A Social Business Strategy Can Make A Company More Responsive and Agile). 

I believe that the social business trend will have a profound impact on the architecture and design of future businesses.  Business processes will change and that will lead to required changes in application software.  Those businesses that make the successful transition will be more agile, more responsive, and more successful than others.

This post provides links to three white papers found on IBM’s Social Business website.  IBM has been on the forefront of the social collaboration and social media marketplace, learning how to leverage these technologies internally.  These white papers provide a great overview of social business, the potential value of the trend, and the challenges all businesses must overcome to become a true social business.

The Social Business: advent of a new age

ibm soc biz - The Social Business (February 2011) This 10 page white paper written by the Lotus team at IBM Software Group defines what a social business is and what it takes to become one.  It puts forth the view that businesses are entering an inflection point where social computing and social media are about to be fully integrated into enterprise application design.  The table of contents are: 

  • Introduction
  • What does it mean to be a Social Business?
  • What is the value of Social Business?
    • Deepen customer Relationships
    • Drive operational efficiencies
    • Optimize the workforce
  • Preparing for the future
  • The right partner for a changing world
  • For more information

Becoming a Social Business: the IBM story

ibm soc biz - Becoming a social business January 2011)  This IBM-sponsored 14 page white paper was written by IDC’s Erin Traudt and Richard Vancil.  In this paper, IDC provides three case studies that describe IBM's internal evolution to a social business.  The paper then uses the learnings from these case studies in order to provide guidance to other large organizations considering making the transformation to a social business.  

  • IDC Opinion
  • Methodology
  • In This White Paper
  • Situation Overview
  • Case Studies
    • IBM DeveloperWorks
    • From Individual Contributor to Community Manager
    • BlueIQ
  • Future Outlook
  • Challenges / Opportunities
  • Conclusion

 

Jamming on social business

ibm soc biz - Jamming on social business (April 2011) Exploring new approaches for the next era of business.  This IBM white paper provides a review of the key findings from a 72-hour online brainstorming session held in February 2011 between over 2,700 participants from over 80 countries.  This report summarizes the key insights gathered from the all the conversations, comments, and tweets. 

The table of the contents of this report reads as follows:

  • The Social Business Jam
  • What is a Jam?
  • Jam insights
    • Building the social business of the future
    • Building participatory organizations through social adoption
    • Using social media to understand and engage with customers
    • What social means for IT
    • Identifying risks and establishing governance
  • Our jamming experience
  • Next Steps

If you are tasked with learning about the social business trend, these three white papers are an excellent resource for you.  More information and case studies can be found at the IBM Social Business website.  For those of you who want to follow the discussion on Twitter, search on the hashtag #socbiz.

Successful Social Media Marketing Requires A Dedicated Community Leader

The social media marketing trend is an important trend for businesses of all sizes.  Business leaders and marketing managers are realizing it can be used to help strengthen relationships and perceptions people have with a company, a brand, a product.

Most social media marketing efforts today need to apply the basics of community marketing and management.  Because at the heart of it, social media marketing efforts should be launched to strengthen relationships the target audience has with the topics and people that are important to your company’s success.  A successful community can accomplish that and more.

91955 I see many social media and community marketing efforts fail because of lack of funding for community management resources.  Many of these social sites and community efforts are developed to support a product launch and then a few months down the road the blog posts dwindle to a few posts a month, the tweets slow down, and the conversation stops.

To be highly successful, communities need to be funded for and supported by dedicated professionals fulfilling certain functions. There are four key functions that can help result in a successful community.

  • Exec Sponsor(s): Serves as the group’s champion, internally and externally. Is able to envision the value of the community over time to both the members as well as the organization.
  • Community Leader(s): Plays the most critical role in the community's success by energizing the sharing process and providing continuous nourishment for the community. Communicates a sense of passion and guides the community towards its goals through consulting, connecting, facilitating, helping, guiding
  • Community Council Members: Advises community leader in launching and sustaining the community. Frequently takes on additional roles as listed below.
  • Community Members: Without these there is no community; the essence of a community is its members. Contributes and extracts value via content, programs, and social/professional network

The community leadership is the most important function. My experience tells me that many in management think that communities 'can run themselves' without dedicated community leadership. Without dedicated community leadership, communities are subject to the momentary whims of the members, relying on the members’ discretionary willingness to perform such functions. In most cases, leaving the community to the membership results in a decline in activity. It is a rare community that can continue to survive without dedicated support.

Forrester says that there are four key tenets of a community leader: 

  • Community Advocate:  The community manager’s primary role is to represent the members of the community. They must listen, monitor, and respond to requests and conversations, both within the community platform and in email.
  • Brand Evangelist:  Community manager promotes events, products, and upgrades using traditional marketing tactics as well as being part of conversations within the community. The community manager must first earn and maintain trust.
  • Facilitator:  Defines, plans, and executes content strategy. Uses forums, blogs, podcasts, and other tools to create content. Mediates disputes: Encourages advocates and deals with — or when necessary removes — detractors. Works with corporate stakeholders to identify content, plan updates, publish, and follow-up.
  • Research and Development Contributor:  Gathers the requirements of the community and presents to product teams. Plans and analyzes results of surveys or focus groups. Facilitates relationships between product teams and customers.

To Forrester's list I'd add the following tasks that many community leaders end up performing themselves:

  • Social Media Manager:  Manages the communities presence in the social media and collaboration sites
  • Meeting Facilitation:  Schedules and facilitates meetings. Ensures meetings stay focused on goals of the community.
  • Subject Matter Expertise:  Shares knowledge and experience.  Ensures the community continues to seek out new and innovative solutions and methods.
  • Relationship Management:  Builds relationships between the members to strengthen the overall community.
  • Knowledge Management:  Gathers, posts and organizes the community knowledge.  Ensures all members have access to content created or referenced by the community.
  • Analyst:  Analyzes the community content and membership network to identify and extract value.
  • Technology Management:  Ensures that the community platform and tools supports the goals and objectives of the community.

These responsibilities do not have to be managed by a single individual. Many times there is more than one community leader.  Also, a good community leader has a good group of council members and one or more of the council members may be accountable for multiple responsibilities, which is likely in the early stages of community development.

So what type of skills are needed by the Community Leader? 

  • Strong online communication skills
  • Approachable and conversational
  • Has the ability to relate to members online and offline
  • Comfortable with Web 2.0, social media, and collaboration tools

Two other important requirements.    The community leader must 

  1. Have a passion for the community domain (topic area)
  2. Have a passion for helping others learn and collaborate. They must experience job satisfaction from helping others.

CIOs: Are YOU Participating In The Social Media?

door

(Note:  I originally posted this as Opening The Social Computing Door at InfoBoom, but thought readers here on HorizonWatching would enjoy the post as well)

At the heart of it, social computing really is all about enabling conversations between two or more people in an open environment. By making conversations more public, we can all learn from each other.  The benefits are very similar to the trend of open source development.  Social computing promotes open conversations instead of ‘behind closed doors’.  In doing so, we encourage learning and collaboration.  And that leads to better decision making.

So how should CIO’s be leveraging social media in their careers and for the enterprises they serve?

Participating in Conversations
First, future IT leaders can begin adding their voice to public conversations happening about subjects important to the IT industry.  If you aren’t participating in the public conversation, you can’t influence it.  My research, 2009 CIO Award Winners Are Not Embracing Social Media, found that 35 industry award-winning CIOs and IT leaders are not active in the social media.   These and future award winning IT leaders should be sharing their thoughts in a public space, not only behind the closed doors.  

For one perspective on this topic, John Suffolk, CIO of the UK Government discusses his views on blogging in Should CIOs blog publicly? and his views on the evolving role of the CIO as a Chief Collaboration Officer.

Gaining Business Leverage
Secondly, CIOs can help the business leadership team in achieving goals for the enterprise by providing leadership and guidance on how to leverage social computing and collaboration platforms, both internally and externally:

  • Learn how transformational social media can be to helping increase growth and/or drive productivity to improve the bottom line. 
  • Work with business leaders to find ways to embed social computing into the framework of every enterprise business process, including product development, marketing, sales, and customer support.  

I’ve compiled links to resources, blog posts, and articles that can help you understand just how transformational social media can be. Check them out at:  Social Media Case Studies and Lessons Learned.

Getting Smarter
To work smarter, we’ll need smarter organizations — enhancing and benefiting from their people’s expertise, enterprise and creativity, rather than inhibiting them.  CIOs can lead in transforming the collaborative infrastructure and processes of our places of work by enabling social conversations that will allow employees, partners, and customers to take advantage of the full scope of an instrumented, interconnected and intelligent planet.

Jumping In
Interested in following some CIOs that are active in the social media?  My research Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media, provides you with a list of CIOs who are setting an example for others on how to leverage the social media.   Explore their blogs and tweets, learn from them, and perhaps you can start adding your thoughts to the conversations as well. 

Want to be more active in the social media, but not sure how you should get started?  Check out my post Leveraging Social Media: 12 Steps To Develop Your Personal Online Brand.

Enterprise 2.0: The Value of Online Communities

The trend of building online Communities of Practices and Customer Communities is an important trend I’ve been watching (and leading/participating in) for a number of years.  I often get asked:  What is the business value of online communities? 

Unfortunately community platforms are lacking tools for community leaders that would allow us to track and measure the impact that these communities have on business results.  So it is a very subjective measurement today.  Note to community platform vendors:  Community Leaders need better dashboard tools.

I have established a graphic that I use to explain the power of communities and the value it can generate to an enterprise.  The story line to the graphic goes something like this:  Community Participation leads to increased Enterprise Knowledge, which leads to improved Organizational Capabilities, which results in positive Business Value for enterprises.  

Here’s my stab at a graphic (Note:  Click on the picture to enlarge and reformat)

Value of Communities

(Click on picture to enlarge) 

Do you have any better graphics, reports, or slide decks that illustrate the business value of communities?  If so, please let me know!   For some resources I’ve uncovered on the value and ROI of social media and online communities, check out my previous post:  Learning About The ROI of Social Media and Online Communities

McKinsey’s View on Web2.0 and Beyond

McKinsey Quarterly had an interesting article this month that talked about how companies should prepare now for when web 2.0 transitions all the way to web 3.0.  The article, Managing beyond Web2.0 pointed out that individuals are increasingly in a position of control on the Internet.  They are demanding the type of information they want on websites and how that information is delivered.   The net is that businesses need to adapt to disruption that the shift to digital media and social networks is causing in order to stay relevant and manage their brand. 

McKinsey believes that the shift to the digital media will force marketers to evolve in order to survive.  The article discusses a model McKinsey is promoting called LEAD (listen, experiment, apply, develop) as a way to create a road map to help companies survive this constant change in the online environment.

Here is a quick summary of the LEAD model

  • Listen.   Have a formal process to monitor and analyze what its customers are saying about the corporate brand and operations online and then use this information as an early-warning system.
  • Experiment. Don’t just monitor social media — engage customers in conversations by using the novel tools of Web 2.0.   As an example, try engaging customers through collaborative efforts in order to conceive new offerings and ad campaigns.
  • Apply.  Next take the experiments and apply them.  To make it easier to reach out to customers, optimize your Web site so that it connects fluidly with online communities and social-media sites.
  • Develop.  Integrate the social media marketing into the company’s marketing mix.  For example, rather than simply buying ads on MySpace or LinkedIn, make interactive Web 2.0 elements part of all marketing programs.

McKinsey says the key is to understand your customer’s online behaviors in order to take advantage of Web 2.0 and what’s beyond Web 2.0.

I like the LEAD model in concept, especially because it stresses Listening as the first step.  I see too many experimental efforts being launched that have not been designed to take into account listening.  The other point I feel gets lost is that there needs to be more of a focus on engaging external stakeholders in conversations.  So while there needs to be a focus on listening, there should also be an equal focus on responding to what is being heard.  The worst thing you can do is to listen and hear what is being said, but not respond. You need to engage in active conversations.

You can check out McKinsey’s article out at Managing beyond Web2.0 .

CIOL: Top Trends in India for 2009

India is a big part of the future of the IT industry.  I think we all realize that.

I was looking for 2009 trends lists that were specific to India and came upon the CIOL website.  CIOL is short for Cybermedia India Online LImited.  The CIO website http://www.ciol.com focuses on the Information Technology industry within India.  It appears that CIOL has become a popular Internet destination for IT professionals, vendors, solution providers, CIOs and CEOs of Indian enterprises.

The website had a Special Report that provided 2009 outlooks on a number of IT segments.  In many cases, CIOL invited executives from Indian IT vendors to provide their own views of what the important trends will be in the India IT industry during 2009. 

Below you'll find that I've summarized the relevant trends posts on CIOL by by major IT trend category. 

CIO Challenges

Mobility

Security

Outsourcing

Enterprise Technologies

Networking Trends 

Storage Trends 

So those are a bunch of trends posts that CIOL published.  After reading them you can get a good feel for what is important in India during 2009.   If anyone reading this has other good sources of 2009 trends in India, please provide them in the comment section below.  Thanks!

Verizon: 2009 Top 10 Tech Trends

Verizon Business issued a press release back on December 10, 2008 with a list of 2009 trends.  The press release, Verizon Business Helps IT Leaders Set Sights for 2009, provides a list of 10 trends Verizon says will be hot during the difficult 2009 economic environment.

You can read the press release for detail, but here is a summary of Verizon Business' list of 10 hot trends for 2009:

  1. Enterprise 2.0:  Web 2.0 is quickly evolving into Enterprise 2.0 as these rich capabilities are creating new business models for some companies and empowering new strategies for others.  Look for Enterprise 2.0 to help organizations take their game to the next level through enhanced collaboration, communications and sharing ideas.
  2. Work as Activity Versus Place:  Companies will continue to recognize the productivity-boosting benefits of enabling mobile teleworkers or at-home teleworkers.  Telework, including new high-definition virtual meetings, will create an increased focus on work as an activity versus a physical location.
  3. Doing More with Less:  Businesses and governments everywhere are looking for ways to do more with less.  In 2009, it's all about productivity.  Companies can choose which functions to keep in-house and which to hand off to a third party.
  4. Visual Communications:  Video will continue to play a starring role, as companies make the most of their IP connections to create a culture of collaboration. From the boardroom to the desktop to the laptop to the mobile phone, more collaboration will take place, as companies increasingly embrace the cost-savings, productivity and environmental benefits of virtual meetings versus business travel.
  5. Unified Communications Integrated Into Business Processes:  With UC now at the forefront of business communications strategies, companies are making decisions about voice telephony that will help them achieve greater collaboration and productivity.  What's next:  UC integrated into automated business processes, where human and machine intelligence commingle in an IP world to drive even greater business growth.
  6. Ready, Set Go IPv6:  IPv6 will be a necessity for companies to achieve mobility and scalability with increased efficiency and ultimately move their businesses forward.
  7. Getting SaaSy:  Buying computing resources a la carte will help companies control costs while attaining the security, performance, scalability and reliability required for the enterprise.    
  8. 360 Security:  Three hundred sixty-degree security, mandatory on any IT checklist, requires that the flow of data be protected in and out of the corporate network and through the extended enterprise of widespread and mobile customers, partners, suppliers and employees.
  9. Eco-Responsibility as Sound Business Strategy:  Companies will evaluate eco-responsibility along with their technology investments as part of an overall business strategy.   Corporate social responsibility is becoming increasingly important in how companies are viewed by their employees, customers and investors.
  10. Cutting Through the Compliance Clutter:  In 2009, expect more, not less, with IT in the hot seat for ensuring IT systems are fully compliant and all the right controls are in place.  "Smart" tools will allow an organization to quickly review whether its partners, customers and suppliers, which form an extended network, are complying with relevant standards and regulations, a critical consideration in today's increasingly connected world.

Number 2 and 4 seems to be potential big trends as business travel is expected to be cut big time in 2009.   I am also interested in seeing how #5 develops this year.

As this is from Verizon, of course it is slanted towards communications technology.  But that is okay as I think it is best to cast a wide net when trying to understand trends.  This list from Verizon can help us understand some  of the issues going on in mobile communications.  We can use this list to dive deeper into any of these trends identified above and make our own assessments.

Baseline.com: Top IT Trends for 2009

In light of today's economic environment, many organizations will be looking for ways to cut people, resources and budgets.  At the same time, forward-thinking enterprises will turn to IT to help them maintain and enhance their competitive advantage in the marketplace.  According to an article I found in Baseline.com, "the following technologies are likely to shape IT and business organizations in the coming year".

  1. Software as a Service (SaaS)
  2. Virtualization
  3. Enterprise Mobility
  4. Energy-Efficient Data Centers
  5. Security, Risk and Compliance
  6. Social Networking
  7. Web 2.0
  8. Document Management and E-Discovery
  9. Project Management and Project Portfolio Management
  10. Web and Video Collaboration

If you want to read the full article, I found this list of IT Trends for 2009 in an article at Baseline.com.

You can download a  PDF version of the article here.