31 Influential Tech Writers Covering the Emerging Wearable Computing Market

Wearable Computing is an emerging trend that will have an impact across consumer and enterprise markets.  I like to think of Wearable devices as another ‘thing’ in the billions of sensors that makes of the emerging Internet of Things.  Over the next decade critical consumer and business applications will make use of these wearable sensors to help us all make decisions about how we can improve our lives and business outcomes.

Next week I will post my trend report “Wearable Computing Technology” to slideshare where it will be available for download.   I’m still working on finalizing that trend report, but the current draft has about 80 slides packed with information on Wearable Computing Technology and the potential impact on enterprises.

One of the slides I will have in that deck will have the following list of Tech Writers/Journalists who are following Wearables market…and who have over 1,000 followers on Twitter.  These are all influential writers who are interested in how the Wearables market is developing.  They have all recently authored articles about the Wearable Computing trend.

I’ve included their Twitter ID below along with a recent pull of how many followers they have on Twitter.  The list is sorted by that follower count.

  1. Dan Farber, Former Editor at CBS Interactive, dbfarber,  31200
  2. Stephen Shankland, Senior writer at CNET News, stshank,  23200
  3. Anthony Ha,  TechCrunch writer, anthonyha,  20200
  4. Todd Wasserman, Mashable business editor, ToddWasserman,  16400
  5. Don Reisinger, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  donreisinger,  14500
  6. Jay Yarow,  Blogger/Writer, Business Insider,  jyarow,  11100
  7. Samantha Murphy Kelly,  Blogger/Writer, Mashable,  HeySamantha,  11000
  8. Frederic Lardinois,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  fredericl,  11000
  9. Darrell Etherington,  BloggerWriter at TechCrunch,  drizzled,  9088
  10. Zack Whittaker,  Writer, editor. @ZDNet, @CNET,  zackwhittaker,  8538
  11. Steve Kovach,  Senior tech editor at Business Insider,  stevekovach,  8486
  12. Rip Empson,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  ripemp,  7736
  13. Steve O’Hear,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  sohear,  7479
  14. Scott Stein,  CNET Senior Editor,  jetscott, 7478
  15. Pete Pachal,  Tech Editor at @Mashable,  petepachal,  7426
  16. Lance Whitney,  Blogger/Writer, CNET,  lancewhit,  7214
  17. Matt Burns,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  mjburnsy,  6175
  18. Brad Molen,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  phonewisdom,  5426
  19. Jordan Crook,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch, jordanrcrook,  5212
  20. Shara Tibken, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  sharatibken,  4653
  21. Chris Velazco,  Blogger/Writer, TechCrunch,  chrisvelazco, 4577
  22. Dara Kerr, Blogger/Writer, CNET, darakerr,  4356
  23. Brooke Crothers, Blogger/Writer, CNET,  mbrookec,  4331
  24. Jon Fingas,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  jonfingas,  4163
  25. Mark Johnson,  CEO, Zite,  philosophygeek,  3533
  26. Chris Matyszczyk,  Blogger/Writer, CNET,  ChrisMatyszczyk,  3478
  27. Jon Phillips,  Editor-in-chief of @PCWorld and @agreenbot,  JonPhillipsSF,  2195
  28. Daniel Cooper,  Blogger, Engadget,  danielwcooper,  2129
  29. Sharif Sakr,  Blogger/Writer, Engadget,  shotsheriff,  1857
  30. H. James Wilson,  Harvard Business Review writer and blogger,  hjameswilson,  1820
  31. Vignesh Ramachandran,  Blogger/Writer, Mashable,  VigneshR, 1012

Bring Your Own Device: A 2013 HorizonWatching Trend Report

The past year has been characterized by the consumerization of IT for most businesses, and the rising popularity of smartphones and tablets entering the workplace continues to intensify.  The BYOD trend refers to the enterprise policy of allowing employees to use their personally owned devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) to access enterprise information and applications.  In 2013, companies will need to have policies and solutions in place to ensure cost-effective, productive and efficient bring your own device (BYOD) workplaces.

2013 Trends in BYOD

  1. Number of Devices: Many workers today are carrying three devices: Laptop, Tablet and Smartphone.
  2. Diversity of Devices: Different manufacturers and different operating systems.
  3. Increased IT Responsibilities: IT departments ramp up to handle Mobile Device Management and Security requirements
  4. Best Practices / Case Studies: As BYOD programs increase, demand will increase for industry-wide best practice and case study documentation.
  5. Geographic Differences: BYOD programs need to be customized by geographic region.
  6. Moble Device Policies: Enterprises develop guidelines/standards for employees to follow
  7. Mobile Workforce Training: Leading edge organizations develop and provide mobile device and mobile app trainings as part of their BYOD program
  8. What’s the ROI of BYOD?: With the increased Mobile Device Management requirements, look for CFOs to evaluate whether BYOD really saves any real money

BYOD Trend Report

Head on over to Slideshare where you can download my report

Mobile Computing Poised To Impact B2B In 2011

Unless you have been living on another planet, you realize that mobile computing and the ecosystem that surrounds it is a major growth industry.  5 years ago, mobile meant being able to make phone calls with your cell phone and perhaps accessing the internet with your laptop. Today, mobile means something totally different, thanks to the introduction of the smartphone, the Iphone, Google’s Android, and just this past year, the iPad. 

HorizonWatching Mobile Computing - 2011 Today, more people are working through remote or mobile access than ever before. Mobile devices are increasingly being used for web searches and applications traditionally done from a desktop. Over the last year there has been a focus on the development of mobile applications, services and cloud infrastructures, both public and private. These efforts will focus on delivering new innovative services to employees, business partners, consumers, and citizens on any device, anywhere.

To stay competitive organizations are extending their resources, data, and connectivity to people wherever they are…whether that is in face-to-face customer engagements or in an operational setting, such as a retail store, supply chain logistics, or field service. In addition, users are demanding access where ever they happen to be….whether they’re in their car, on a plane, in a hotel, or on a weekend camping trip.

Mobile email, mobile websites and mobile applications are becoming viable channels in which to conduct business.  As smartphone adoption continue to grow through the roof, we are now seeing with the popularity of the iPad the emergence of the tablet form factor. I believe we are moving towards a place where the typical business user might have three devices….a laptop, a smartphone, and a tablet. IT developers will need to accommodate all three display form factors into their application environment.

And as a result, the mobile application infrastructure will need become more sophisticated. Enabling technologies will be new devices, faster networks, new location-aware technology, and improved mobile applications.

One area of focus today is Mobile Marketing. Consumers are wanting to use their mobile devices to help them do searches, get information on products and services, and help them make purchase decisions.  As consumers get used to using their mobile devices for consumer product purchases, they will increasingly want to use their devices in a business context. Marketing and sales managers need to understand the potential uses of mobile devices and how to apply the mobile marketing techniques to increase sales.

Some Analyst Perspectives

“Brands seeking a persistent presence with their customers must have a strategy to engage with their customers via mobile phones.” – Forrester, Sept. 2010 (link)

“59 percent of mobile consumers plan to use their mobile phone for holiday shopping and planning holiday celebrations, not including making phone calls” – Mobile Marketing Association, Nov. 2010 (Link)

“Consumers are relying on their mobile phones for more than talking and texting these days. They are using them for everything from reading and writing emails to watching the news, trading stocks, and booking hotel rooms.” – Forrester, Sept. 2010 (link)

“Mobile Proximity Marketing In U.S. to Reach $750M By 2011 And Nearly $6B By 2015” – Borrell Associates, Oct 2010 (link)

Adoption Drivers:

  • Growth of smartphones/tablets
  • The application development community is focused on developing mobile web application services and improvements in apps, browsers, and search will push new adoption.
  • Growth of location based apps
  • Faster networks (4G )
  • Mobile worker efficiency and productivity
  • Gen Y lives mobile / wireless life and will expect that in B2B transactions
  • Mobile devices are increasingly being used for web searches and applications traditionally done from a desktop.

Challenges:

  • Integrating mobile into business processes
  • Mobile analytics
  • Coverage in rural and undeveloped regions
  • Cost, Security issues.
  • Managing productivity of a remote workforce.
  • Reliability of mobile technologies

Implications for B2B:

  • Innovative mobile solutions enable new business models
  • Business processes and applications have to be re-engineered for mobile.
  • Expect increased interest in technologies that can boost the productivity of a remote workforce.
  • Growth countries use mobile as a leapfrogging approach to connect the base of the socio-economic pyramid to the formal economy.
  • Emerging solutions will include voice search, location-aware, and mobile video.
  • There will be increased focus on the development of enterprise-based mobile applications, services and cloud infrastructures, both public and private.
  • Knowledge economy produces a global and virtual workforce.
  • Mobile becomes a critical part of Unified Communication solutions

Some key mobile trends to watch in 2011 include Voice Search, Location Based Services, Video, Gaming, Event-Based Marketing, and Augmented Reality. On the horizon are applications like Mobile Video Collaboration solutions and 3D Mobile Internet allowing customers to browse 3D pictures/videos of products.  All this has implications for business processes throughout the organization. Some older companies will need to change culture and transform workflows as a result.  CIOs and IT leaders need to understand how mobile fits into their organization’s enterprise wide unified communications and social collaboration strategy.

For More Information – Internet

Cloud Computing Is Enabling The Next Phase Of The Internet Evolution

Carlota Perez wrote a book titled “Technological Revolutions and Financial Capital” (2002) that is a real interesting read.  Perez says that there have been five historical waves of economic and social transformation in the developed economies of the world. Each of these waves have what she calls an Installation phase followed by a crash of some sort and then a Deployment period. 

HorizonWatching - Carlota Perz 5 Waves

Perez says that our global economy has now entered the deployment phase of the fifth technology investment cycle, which she says is the Age of Information and Telecommunications (see embedded picture).  Perez says that this will be a period of adjustment when novel business models will exploit the new IT infrastructure that is now being put in place that enable more porous, open, collaborative approaches that seek to leverage the economics and flexibility of global sourcing.  She expects enterprises of all sizes will employ technology to help them transform their business models, processes and operations.

As mentioned, Perez says we are entering this Deployment phase. As we do there are some key characteristics across our global economy that is impacting how this phase develops. The firms that will succeed are the firms that will embrace these characteristics and the change that is happening in order to innovate and leapfrog competition.

Important characteristics of our global economy includes:

  • A level, global economic playing field presents new opportunities, challenges and competitive technologies
  • New technologies, services and skills are emerging…and they are quickly being integrated into every aspect of business and everyday life
  • The pace of change is dramatically compressing “windows of opportunity” for real competitive advantage.
  • Billions of skilled people are entering the world’s economy, fundamentally transforming the mix of the global workforce
  • The interconnected nature of our world’s economy means businesses must be prepared to respond to – and capitalize on – changes in real time, with unprecedented flexibility.

While all this is happening, we are moving into what I believe is the third stage of the Internet. Call it Web 3.0 or whatever you wish, but cloud computing is perhaps the most important technology.  In fact, I believe that cloud computing is the key enabling technology for this next technological wave and the next phase in the evolution of the Internet.

HorizonWatching - Private Clouds Enables Next Wave of the Internet

Back in the mid to late 1990s companies were just concerned with getting websites up so they could have a presence on the Internet. It was all about providing very basic information to the public. But soon the so called e-commerce trend arose and business was being conducted on the Internet. Then Web 2.0 came into play and all users realized that they could share their ideas, create content, and collaborate online.  We are now well into this next phase of the evolution where the enabling technologies will be cloud, analytics, mobile, video, and semantic capabilities.  This so called Web 3.0 phase will provide applications that are much more immersive, social, and collaborative in nature.  Combined that with an explosion of networked sensors and advanced predictive analytic and all the Smarter Planet initiatives will become a reality. 

But the most important enabler will be the combination of private and public cloud computing infrastructures that will be the ‘engine’ of the future Internet.

Cloud Computing In 2011: Private Clouds Are An Important Trend

The cloud computing ‘buzz’ has been going on now for 3 years. IBM Cloud White Papers Benefits include reduced costs, improved service delivery and an enablement of business innovation.   Public clouds have been a major part of the discussion and experimentation.  However, many CIOs and business leaders are concerned with having their data residing outside their firewall.   So, in 2011, I expect we’ll see more companies adopting approaches to private clouds in parts of their businesses.  

Adoption Drivers

  • Commoditization and standardization of technologies,
  • Virtualization and the rise of service-oriented software Architectures,
  • Dramatic growth in popularity/use of the Internet and the Web.

Adoption Inhibitors

  • Bandwidth, Complexity, Standards, Security, Privacy, Compliance, Performance, Loss of Control of Data outside the firewall.

Analyst Perspective

As can be seen by the quotes below, more companies have begun adopting approaches to private clouds in parts of their businesses.  Analysts agree that enterprises will be interested in learning more about how to leverage private clouds within their own ecosystems.

“Almost one-quarter of the infrastructure and operations (I&O) professionals polled in our Forrsights Hardware Survey, Q3 2010 said that building a private cloud is a high or critical priority for them. Five percent said it is critical.” – Forrester Research (Link)

“According to recent IDC survey results, almost half of respondents, 44%, are considering private clouds.” – IDC (Link)

“The cloud market is evolving rapidly, with 39 percent of survey respondents worldwide indicating they allocated IT budget to cloud computing as a key initiative for their organization” – Gartner (Link)

“Private clouds’ are a natural next step in the evolution of data centers over the last ten years, toward consolidated, virtualized and automated IT service delivery environments.” – Frank Gens, IDC (Link)

“there is still some lingering apprehension over issues like integration, availability, security, and costs. These concerns, and how they are addressed by IT vendors, will continue to guide the adoption of cloud computing over the next several years.” – IDC (Link)

So the analysts agree that a growing number of organizations are turning to clouds to manage basic applications. Core business apps, IT infrastructure services, analytics, and app dev/test/deploy are next in line. However, as mentioned, since CIOs and business leaders are concerned with having their data residing outside their firewall, 

What To Expect In 2011

  • Expect to see mid and large-sized businesses to increase their experimentation and implementation of private clouds as the promise of the cloud delivery model is one that is just too good to pass up. 
  • There’s also a growing interest in private ‘community clouds’ hosted for a group of organizations who trust each other.
  • Something else to watch out for this year is how cloud computing will impact the mobile infrastructure and ecosystems in 2011.

Since cloud is a disruptive new way to deliver software & services, cloud will enable both new opportunities as well as new competitors in all areas of business.

For More Information

Feeding Edge: 7 Predictions For The Next Decade

FeedingEdge

Feeding Edge is a consulting company based out of the UK, founded by epredator (ex-IBMer Ian Hughes), a globally recognized metaverse evangelist and tribal leader.   I’ve been a follower of epredator ever since I first ventured into Second Life back in 2006.  He has a great vision for how gaming will improve the future of work and business.

Feeding Edge recently posted a set of 7 predictions about the next 10 years on it’s website’s blog Life at the Feeding Edge

Here is a summary of the seven predictions….

  1. Keep Walking. Our thirst for mobile computing may stress traditional telecom’s business.
  2. Batteries.  Feeding Edge says we need further innovation in batteries.
  3. 3d Printing. 10 years should be enough for this to become “mainstream”.
  4. Games as work. Work and business is a role playing game.
  5. Brands crossing digital borders.  Businesses must learn to engage with people where ever they are online….and offline.
  6. Collectives vs Corporate. Feeding Edge sees a need to reduce long statements and terms and conditions on digital content.
  7. Renaissance – Access for All.  Putting technology in the hands of all people is going to cause a generational renaissance.

Check out Feed'ing Edge’s full post “Next Decade?” at  http://www.feedingedge.co.uk/blog/2009/12/30/the-next-decade/ 

Thanks for the list epredator.