Wearables has a big place in the future of Mobile Computing

As mentioned previously, I am working on a Trend Report on the topic of Wearables.  The more I work on it, the more content I develop….pushing back the publication date further and further.  The report will be similar in look and feel to my other published trend reports.

Mobile computing devices continue to shrink in size and adapt to free up our hands, making it more convenient than ever for users to multitask.  Wearable computing, or wearables, is the buzz of the mobile community in 2014.   Consumers are increasingly buying the fitness bands and trackers as a way to monitor their activities.  And new devices like smart glasses and smart watches are invading the market.  As they do, application developers are beginning to see new opportunities for applications that gather data, perform analysis on that data, and then provide analytics and visualizations back to the user.

Juniper Research says “The retail revenue from smart wearable devices, including smart watches and glasses, will reach $19 billion by 2018.”   Gartner says “The worldwide revenue from wearable electronic devices, apps and services for fitness and personal health is anticipated to be $1.6 billion this year, increasing to $5 billion by 2016”.

While the wearables market still has very much a consumer feel to it, 2014 will be the year leading enterprises are piloting fitness trackers for employee wellness / fitness programs and smart glasses / smart watches for enhancing worker productivity.   Adding further momentum to the growth of the market will be the entry of most of the major platforms into the space, including Google, Microsoft, Samsung, and Apple.

For more on the the future of wearables, check out the following resources:

I hope to have my Trend Report published in the next week or two.  Until then, check out my other Trend Reports at  http://www.slideshare.net/horizonwatching

Enterprise Mobile Computing Trend and Prediction Articles for 2014

The rise of mobility in the enterprise has already had a huge impact, and it will only continue to grow. While there’s much focus from a consumer standpoint on the different mobile and wearable devices, over the next three to five years the most cutting edge advances in mobile will not be in device itself, but instead what is done with it. Mobile computing is at a turning point as we are entering the second wave of the mobile revolution: the business of mobile. Just as the Internet transformed industries like banking, travel and healthcare – so too will mobile.

I recently published my trend report Enterprise Mobile Computing: A HorizonWatching 2014 Trend Report.  The 32 page report provides an overview of Enterprise Mobile Computing Trends to Watch in 2014. Below I’ve provided you some articles on this trend that I thought you would want to read.

Source Title
CIO.com 10 Mobile Tech Predictions for 2014 (Slideshow)
Online Media Daily 2014 Trends In Mobile Marketing And Advertising
Information Age Mobile collaboration in 2014: 4 big predictions
Mobile Enterprise Mobility Outlook 2014
365Online Top 11 Mobile Trends Of 2013
Forbes 7 Ways Mobile Will Change Business In 2014
The Mobile Retail Blog 3 Mobile Marketing Trends to Emerge in 2014
Industrial Distribution Three Key Trends In Mobile Computing In 2014
Mobility TechZone 2014 Prediction: Consolidation Will Firm Its Grip
Mobile Enterprise Technology Predictions

 

23 BYOD Trends and Prediction Lists for 2013

BYOD2 Today I am sharing with you a list of articles and blog posts I’ve found and inventoried that discuss trends and predictions for the coming year related to the Consumerization of IT and “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) trends.  

Consumerization of IT refers to the trend of innovative technologies (hardware, software, solutions, services) that were designed for consumers making their way into the corporate world.  BYOD is the trend that is specific to the explosion of mobile devices that consumers are buying and how those consumers want to use those personal devices to access corporate networks, applications and data.

It’s important to note that the BYOD trend is not just about companys letting employes use their own devices. It’s also about supporting employees with resources and technical expertise in order to leverage those mobile devices into something that works for the employee and also works for the company.

Here then is a list of 23 blog posts and articles that discuss these trends.

Source Title of Article / Blog Post
CIO.com 2013 Prediction: BYOD on the Decline?
CITEWorld Consumerization in 2013: the big stories to watch
ComputerWorld Forecast 2013: Setting a mobile risk management strategy
ComputerWorld One reliable prediction for 2013: BYOD still a bear for IT
ComputerWorld Where are mobility and consumerization of IT heading in 2013?
DataCOM 13 Mobility and BYOD Tips for 2013
Enterprise Systems Top 3 Emerging BYOD Trends for 2013
Field Aware Implementing BYOD in 2013
Gartner Gartner Identifies Three Security Hurdles to Overcome When Shifting From Enterprise-Owned Devices to BYOD
Ian Tibble What’s Next for BYOD – 2013 and Beyond
InformationWeek 5 Ways To Stay Ahead Of Consumerization Of IT
InfoSec Island What’s Next For BYOD – 2013 And Beyond
ITBusinessEdge BYOD in 2013: Yes, It Is Going to Get Worse
Petri Bring Your Own Device: Will 2013 be the Year of BYOD?
Point 2 Security BYOD Concerns Loom Large in 2013
Redmondmag.com BYOD and Cloud Will Fuel IDMaaS Landscape in 2013
SC Magazine Prediction: BYOD may go away in 2013
Silicon Angle BYOD + Build Your Own App Taking Over Mobility in 2013
Simply Security Cloud to Drive IT Consumerization in 2013
TabTimes 2013 To Do For IT Departments
TeoTech BYOD in 2013
The A Team BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) – 2013 the Year of the Tablet

Enterprise Mobile Computing: IBM Websites, Social Sites, White Papers and Reports

mobility It’s hard to talk to an enterprise customer these days without getting into a discussion about Mobile Computing. Every day more and more mobile devices are being shipped to enterprise workers, who are increasingly using these devices (instead of laptops and desktops) in order to perform their daily business activities.

Mobile is a key part of the new computing platform going forward.  IT leaders need to be out in front of this disruptive shift and understand how it impacts the way work is done at their company.  Some key mobile technology sub-trends to watch in 2013 include Voice Search, Voice Assistants, Location Based Services, Gaming, Event-Based Marketing, and Augmented Reality.  And within the next few years we will see innovations in Mobile Video and 3D Mobile Internet.   For a view into potential applications five years for now, see the recently announced IBM 5 in 5 predictions.

All this has implications for IT skills and business processes throughout the organization.   CIOs and IT leaders will want to understand how mobile fits into their organization’s unified communications strategy as well as the enterprise-wide collaboration and social business strategy.  The increasing use of Smartphones and tablet computers as personal and business tools has brought organizations and their employees new levels of productivity, flexibility and mobility. However, their use is a double-edged sword, bringing with it new levels of complexity to IT management and security.

To help you learn more about the enterprise mobile computing trend, the following is a list of IBM websites related to Mobile computing trend.  Included are links to IBM websites, social sites, and white papers/reports. 

IBM Websites 

  • IBM Portal: 
    • Why Mobile Enterprise – Overview of the importance of the mobile enterprise trend
    • Why IBM – tabs for “Build & Connect”, “Manage and Secure”, “Extend and Transform” and “Events” that provide information about IBM’s focus on the mobile enterprise trend as well as resources and events to learn more.
    • See it in action – Case Studies of companies that have implemented mobile enterprise solutions
    • Offerings –  Offerings categorized under “Build & Connect”, “Manage and Secure”, “Extend and Transform” and “Mobile Services” provides information on IBM offerings in the mobile enterprise market
    • Developer Resources –  Information for mobile app developers
  • IBM Services: 
  • IBM Software
  • IBM Research:  Research Mobile Computing describes IBM Research and it’s focus on mobile computing
  • IBM Press Kit:  IBM and the Mobile Web  provides background information and press articles

IBM Accounts on Social Platforms

IBM White Papers

Consumerization of IT / BYOD: IBM Websites, White Papers and Reports

byod Business Professionals are in fact consumers.  And consumers today have more choice, more flexibily, and more options in the devices that they use to access the Internet every day, including smartphones, tablets, and personal laptops.   Consumers are using these devices to access the new applications and social networks that they use to connect with each other for both personal and business reasons.  As that technology spills over into their professional lives, the line between the personal and the professional is blurring.

It’s no surprise that Business Professionals want to use the same technology at work as they use at home.    However, while consumer technology offers some great potential benefits for the business, it also represents added risk in terms of security, privacy, and compliance.  So IT leaders need to strike a balance between the desires of users and the requirements of the enterprise.

IBM has a bunch of content available to for you to learn more about this trend.  Below you will find links to the most current IBM reports, websites, and social accounts related to the social business trend.  The reports and sites listed below are all hotlinked.  If you see something that is missing, let me know and I will revise this post.

BYOD-Related Websites by IBM

BYOD-Related Social Media Sites

BYOD-Related IBM White Papers and Reports

BYOD-Related IBM Presentations

2011 Horizon Report: Emerging Trends in Higher Education Technology

The 2011 Horizon Report was released earlier this year at the by EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) and the New Media Consortium (NMC).  

This report has staying power as it has been released every year since 2002.  Each year, the report identifies six emerging technologies that are likely to have a significant impact on higher education in the next one to five years.  The format of the report stays consistent every year, but the process to arrive at the six emerging technologies keeps improving. 

The report presents an overview of each of the six technologies accompanied by examples and suggested readings for each technology.  Below I provide my summary of the six emerging summaries. I’ve also embedded a video (3:30) that provides you with an overview from the NMC team.

The areas of emerging technology cited for 2011 are:

Timeframe:  The Next 12 months…

  • Electronic books:   The Horizon Report mentions that e-books have taken hold strongly in the consumer sector and the time for mass adoption across campuses is now.  This trend has been strongly enabled by the explosion of tablet computing, which can augment text with interactive experiences, support classroom note-taking and research activities, and allow readers to interact socially.  This trend will totally change our perception of what it means to read.
  • Mobiles (i.e., mobile devices).   Mobiles enable ubiquitous access to information, social networks, tools for learning and productivity, and much more.  2011 will bring new interfaces and new apps that leverage location-awareness.  The mobile device of is a versatile tool that can be easily adapted to a host of tasks for learning, productivity, and social networking.

Timeframe:  Next 1-3 years….

  • Augmented reality, enables content providers the ability to provide additional information to what ever users are viewing on a screen device.  This information is ‘layered’ over the whatever the user is viewing at the time (e.g. whether in the real world, or on a screen). While most applications have been in the consumer sector (tourism is one application example)), we can expect new applications to become available over the nest 1-3 years that will enhance learning.  Augmented reality brings a significant potential to supplement information delivered via computers, mobile devices, video, and even the printed book.
  • Game-based learning continues to grow as an application area that can enhance learning for students of all ages. We should expect to see a whole new suite of emerging game and simulation-based applications that are developed expressly to enhance the learning process.  The report says that perhaps the  greatest potential of games for learning lies in their ability to foster collaboration, problem-solving, and procedural thinking.

 

Timeframe:  4-5 years…

  • Gesture-based computing technologies continue to evolve. Gone is the day of interacting with the computer via just a keyboard or a mouse.  Gestures allow the motions of the body to control computing devices.  The next generation of students entering higher education will have grown accustomed to interacting with computers and gaming systems via touching, tapping, swiping, jumping, and moving.  The Horizon Report specifically mentions new interface technologies such as Kinect, SixthSense, and Tamper, which make interactions with computational devices far more intuitive and embodied.
  • Learning analytics employs a combination of data-gathering tools and analytic techniques to study student engagement, performance, and progress in practice.  The goal is not just to understand the past, but to help predict the future.  This technology trend area will help administrators and teachers revise curricula, teaching, and assessment in real time.  Learning analytics will allow educational institutions to tailor education to individual students more effectively.

For more information, you can download the 2010 Horizon Report or view the 2011 Web version

Mobile Computing Poised To Impact B2B In 2011

Unless you have been living on another planet, you realize that mobile computing and the ecosystem that surrounds it is a major growth industry.  5 years ago, mobile meant being able to make phone calls with your cell phone and perhaps accessing the internet with your laptop. Today, mobile means something totally different, thanks to the introduction of the smartphone, the Iphone, Google’s Android, and just this past year, the iPad. 

HorizonWatching Mobile Computing - 2011 Today, more people are working through remote or mobile access than ever before. Mobile devices are increasingly being used for web searches and applications traditionally done from a desktop. Over the last year there has been a focus on the development of mobile applications, services and cloud infrastructures, both public and private. These efforts will focus on delivering new innovative services to employees, business partners, consumers, and citizens on any device, anywhere.

To stay competitive organizations are extending their resources, data, and connectivity to people wherever they are…whether that is in face-to-face customer engagements or in an operational setting, such as a retail store, supply chain logistics, or field service. In addition, users are demanding access where ever they happen to be….whether they’re in their car, on a plane, in a hotel, or on a weekend camping trip.

Mobile email, mobile websites and mobile applications are becoming viable channels in which to conduct business.  As smartphone adoption continue to grow through the roof, we are now seeing with the popularity of the iPad the emergence of the tablet form factor. I believe we are moving towards a place where the typical business user might have three devices….a laptop, a smartphone, and a tablet. IT developers will need to accommodate all three display form factors into their application environment.

And as a result, the mobile application infrastructure will need become more sophisticated. Enabling technologies will be new devices, faster networks, new location-aware technology, and improved mobile applications.

One area of focus today is Mobile Marketing. Consumers are wanting to use their mobile devices to help them do searches, get information on products and services, and help them make purchase decisions.  As consumers get used to using their mobile devices for consumer product purchases, they will increasingly want to use their devices in a business context. Marketing and sales managers need to understand the potential uses of mobile devices and how to apply the mobile marketing techniques to increase sales.

Some Analyst Perspectives

“Brands seeking a persistent presence with their customers must have a strategy to engage with their customers via mobile phones.” – Forrester, Sept. 2010 (link)

“59 percent of mobile consumers plan to use their mobile phone for holiday shopping and planning holiday celebrations, not including making phone calls” – Mobile Marketing Association, Nov. 2010 (Link)

“Consumers are relying on their mobile phones for more than talking and texting these days. They are using them for everything from reading and writing emails to watching the news, trading stocks, and booking hotel rooms.” – Forrester, Sept. 2010 (link)

“Mobile Proximity Marketing In U.S. to Reach $750M By 2011 And Nearly $6B By 2015” – Borrell Associates, Oct 2010 (link)

Adoption Drivers:

  • Growth of smartphones/tablets
  • The application development community is focused on developing mobile web application services and improvements in apps, browsers, and search will push new adoption.
  • Growth of location based apps
  • Faster networks (4G )
  • Mobile worker efficiency and productivity
  • Gen Y lives mobile / wireless life and will expect that in B2B transactions
  • Mobile devices are increasingly being used for web searches and applications traditionally done from a desktop.

Challenges:

  • Integrating mobile into business processes
  • Mobile analytics
  • Coverage in rural and undeveloped regions
  • Cost, Security issues.
  • Managing productivity of a remote workforce.
  • Reliability of mobile technologies

Implications for B2B:

  • Innovative mobile solutions enable new business models
  • Business processes and applications have to be re-engineered for mobile.
  • Expect increased interest in technologies that can boost the productivity of a remote workforce.
  • Growth countries use mobile as a leapfrogging approach to connect the base of the socio-economic pyramid to the formal economy.
  • Emerging solutions will include voice search, location-aware, and mobile video.
  • There will be increased focus on the development of enterprise-based mobile applications, services and cloud infrastructures, both public and private.
  • Knowledge economy produces a global and virtual workforce.
  • Mobile becomes a critical part of Unified Communication solutions

Some key mobile trends to watch in 2011 include Voice Search, Location Based Services, Video, Gaming, Event-Based Marketing, and Augmented Reality. On the horizon are applications like Mobile Video Collaboration solutions and 3D Mobile Internet allowing customers to browse 3D pictures/videos of products.  All this has implications for business processes throughout the organization. Some older companies will need to change culture and transform workflows as a result.  CIOs and IT leaders need to understand how mobile fits into their organization’s enterprise wide unified communications and social collaboration strategy.

For More Information – Internet

Frost & Sullivan: Global Megatrends Shaping Our Future

Today I attended a webinar offered by research firm Frost & Sullivan that was titled “Mega Trends that will Shape the Future of the World”.  The stated purpose of the webinar was to discuss the most important global mega trends, potential scenarios of specific trends in 2020, and the implications of these mega trends in transforming society, markets and cultures. 

The webinar was jointly led by Frost & Sullivan Partner Sarwant Singh and Frost & Sullivan Team Leader Archana Amarnath. For those of you who want to view the webinar, at the end of this post I have the embedded the webinar, courtesy of Frost & Sullivan and Bright Talk.

I really enjoyed the webinar.  Here is my review of the megatrends covered during the webinar.

1)  Urbanization.   Frost confirms a trend that we’ve seen mentioned by others.  That is that the world’s population is increasingly shifting towards an urban environment.  Frost says that this trend will result in mega cities, mega regions, and mega transportation/business corridors.   Technology will be applied to enhance living and business activities within these mega-environments.

As a result of the urbanization trend, technology companies will try to address issues that impact consumer and business activities.  Frost predicts there will be an increased focus on making cities ‘Smarter’.  There will be over 40 global cities to achieve a designation of being “SMART” by 2020.  Frost says that more than 50% of the smart cities of 2025 will be from Europe and North America.   As the worlds businesses competes to realize the smart city opportunity, Frost expects there to be a convergence of smart city technology that will ultimately lead to convergence of competition in three different industries 1) Energy Infrastructure Players, 2) IT Players, and 2) Automation/Building Control Players.

2) Social Trends.  Frost mentioned three sub-trends here 1) Geo Socialization, 2) Generation Y and 3) Reverse Brain Drain.   

Geo Socialization.  Frost says Geo Socialization services will become an important part of the landscape in 2020 as we’ll see all sorts of location based services being pushed to mobile consumers and mobile business workers.

Gen Y.  There will be an increased focus placed on new and innovative products and services that cater to the values, beliefs, interests, and lifestyles of the younger generation.  A prime market will be the younger generation in India and China, who are increasingly displaying four key characteristics as consumers

  • Personalization and Individualization
  • Techno Savvy and Connected 24×7
  • Civic and Environmentally Friendly
  • Demanding and Impatient – “Fast and the Furious

Reverse Brain Drain.  Frost expects there to be a migration of skilled and educated workers from developed companies back to their homelands to fill a shortage of CXO Positions In BRIC countries.  Frost also says that many Europeans and Americans will seek jobs in these developing countries in the future in order to participate in the huge growth economies that are materializing.

3) Increased Satellites In Orbit.   Frost expects that by 2020 there will over 900 satellites will be launched annually around the globe. While this will cause a traffic jam in space, all those satellites will enable a whole set of new and innovative applications and services.

4) Cyber Warfare.  Frost is concerned that by 2020 cyber warfare will become an everyday occurrence.  In fact, Frost says that if there is a World War 3 in our future, cyber warfare will play an important part. 

5) Robot Technology.   Frost paints a strong future for robots across all sectors of the economy.  Future robots will utilize artificial intelligence and predictive analytics to be able to help us with everyday decision making.  The top applications for industrial robots will be in Robots in Space, Military, Healthcare

6) Virtual Worlds.  Frost says that by 2020, 3D simulated environments will be used to significantly enhance consumer and business activities.   Simulation and virtual world technology will change the way we interact with users and data.  For example, virtual shopping will allow customers to try products without leaving their homes.   Virtual surgeries will allow doctors to train for new types of procedures just like airplane pilots train in flight simulators today.  Frost explained that haptic technology is an an enabling technology for these immersive virtual and simulation environments in the future.

7) Cloud Computing.   Frost says we will have smart clouds by 2020.  These will be flexible and customized clouds created by consolidation of different off premise hybrid cloud services.  Cloud computing will allow future information technology infrastructures to  be scaled up or down as the workload demands.  Key enabling technologies will be  API standards and cloud security standards.

8) Innovating to Zero.   As we move towards 2020, there will be a focus on using emerging technologies to minimize failures.  Governments and businesses alike will strive to reach a level of zero security accidents, zero facility failures, zero emissions, zero accidents.   Frost mentioned initiatives in Norway as well as initiatives in the power generation generation industry to enable innovative zero emission technologies including Wind energy, Solar PV Cells, Ocean energy, Geothermal Energy, Bio Fuels, and Travelling Wave Reactors.

9) Infrastructure Development and New Transportation Corridors.  Frost expects higher spending on travel, transportation, and utilities infrastructures.  Frost mentioned the highest spending may be in water management systems, but also mentioned power generation/distribution, Road & Rail, and Air/Seaports.    Frost provided the example of the Trans-Siberian railroad.   This new transportation corridor will result in industrial and business hubs along the railroad, much like “Route 66” did to the American landscape.  Development of Trans-Siberian railroad will have significant socio economic and business impact to Russia. 

10) E-Mobility.  Frost expects that over the next decade all sorts of new forms of personal transportation vehicles will make its way to the economy.  Many of these will target urban commuters who just need to get to work and back.  Frost says that 40 million electric 2 and 4 wheeled vehicles will be sold annually around the globe by 20120.   

11) Healthcare:  Spending will rise globally.  Frost says that if the current spending trend continues, Healthcare spending will almost double by 2050.  Some countries will end up spending 20-30% of their GDP on Healthcare.   Spending will transition away from treating and more for predictive analytics that will be used to help diagnose and monitor conditions before they become serious.


A BrightTALK Channel

For more information.

CIOs: Social Computing Is The Most Risky Emerging Technology

IBM recently published it’s 2010 Global Risk Study and the findings confirm that IT leaders today are very concerned about IT security and business resiliency.  The report found that 88% of those surveyed say that their company’s approach to risk is less than expert.  This comes at a time when there are increasing demands on IT leaders to accelerate their implementation of emerging technologies like cloud computing and social computing.

IBM surveyed 560 IT managers and CIOs from all types of companies located all over the world to talk in order to understand issues surrounding IT risks from the perspective of IT leaders.  IBM wanted to understand what their biggest obstacles are, where their biggest challenges lie, where they see the greatest potential for adding business value.

What caught my eye was a couple of questions in the survey that dealt with the risk involved with implementing emerging technologies.  Respondents to the survey were asked how their organization is positioned to acquire and deploy five emerging technologies

  1. Social computing/networking tools
  2. Mobile platforms
  3. Cloud computing
  4. Virtualization
  5. Service-oriented architecture (SOA)

Of these five technologies, social networking, mobile platforms and cloud computing were rated the most risky emerging technologies.    Social networking tools (64% respondents) came out on top as the technology that posed the greatest risk.  Second was mobile platforms (54%) followed by cloud computing (43%).  See the graph of the survey results below.

IBM Risk Study 2010  

According to the survey report, IT leaders say that the risks of these emerging technologies include issues related to accessibility, use and control of data (especially regarding social computing/networking), and the danger of having unauthorized access to confidential, proprietary information.

It’s not surprising that social networking/computing technologies is perceived as a risky emerging technology.   Most enterprises are still trying to figure out how to leverage social computing and extract business value.  There needs to be a greater focus by IT and Business leaders on establishing social computing processes, methods, and professional roles.   Once this is done, the risks can be minimized and social networking tools can be fully integrated into the IT infrastructure and business process workflow.

For More Information

Get the report  The evolving role of IT managers and CIOs Findings from the 2010 IBM Global IT Risk Study

Browse for more related information at the IBM Smarter Security & Resilience website.

Intelligent Transportation Scenario: Advanced Traveler Information Systems

LONDN023 I’m wondering when in the future will we arrive at a place where there will be open standards for traffic information that will allow us to have Advanced Traveler Information Systems.  

Traffic information is certainly needed by everyone.  That means we need to have it available on all sorts of devices using all sorts of applications.   So why not open standards so the information can be available and used to help us all get from point A to point B in less time and with less frustration/hassle?

I see a future where Advanced Traveler Information Systems are capable of advising travelers of suggested travel route changes due to traffic congestion changes…all in real time.  An integrated system would need to be able to draw real-time information from any type of transportation in the region, then process that information against the traveler’s requests/needs,  then provide that information back to the traveler in the format needed for the traveler’s device and application.

Here is a scenario….

Monday evening

1. Jack receives an email from his global head of marketing that an important client will be visiting London to discuss a new deal. Jack is to host dinner for the global client on Friday evening at Nobu in London.

2. Jack books a table over the Internet for 1900 on Friday and puts the details into his Lotus Calendar.

Friday

10:00 – The day has not started well: Jack is in back-to-back meetings the entire day with some client issues.

17:30 – Jack’s online calendar reminds him of the dinner and alerts him of his travel options based on reaching the restaurant by 1900:

  1. Taxi: due to ongoing road works on the route, there is a bad traffic jam along the route – he would need to leave the office by 1800. The estimated cost was £25.
  2. Bus: as there were bus lanes throughout the route, the road works would not impact the journey too significantly – he would need to leave the office by 1810. The cost would be £2.
  3. Tube & walking: the Piccadilly line was currently on schedule; he would need to start walking to the Tube by 1815. The cost would be £3.

The application on Jack’s smartphone recommends that Jack go with option 4:  Tube and walking.

18:20  -  On Jack’s walk to the Tube, his smartphone alerts him of a security incident on the Bakerloo Tube line. If he were to continue with the planned route, he would arrive at the restaurant only at 1945. It advises him to change his route by walking to the nearest bus stop. The bus route would get him to the restaurant at 1910.

19:10 – Jack arrives at the restaurant slightly late but thankfully his guest has not yet arrived – the guest took a taxi and was caught in a traffic jam!

The successful outcome in the scenario above is dependent on open transportation information standards and Advanced Traveler Information Systems, including

  • An extensive sensor-based transportation system operating in the region where real-time information is collected on every type of transportation available to the traveler
  • An back office analytics-rich system capable of analyzing the millions of transactions coming into the system for each mode of transportation
  • Applications available on personal mobile handheld devices capable of interacting with the regional Advanced Traveler Information System.  The mobile application needs to be able to become an agent for the person, acting on stored personal preferences, the calendar for the day, and the real-time information available from the regional system.

Gartner: 10 Emerging Mobile Technologies to Watch

Gartner Mobile Technologies to Watch Today, more people are working through remote or mobile access than ever before. To stay competitive in an interconnected world, enterprises need to extend their resources, data, and connectivity to individuals wherever they are: in face-to-face customer engagements; in operational settings, such as retail, logistics, or field service; and on the road, whether they’re in their car, on a plane, or in a hotel.  Mobile technologies will all play such an important part in the development of mobile applications, solutions, and services and we all need to monitor how they are adopted over the next few years.

In advance of Gartner’s Wireless, Networking & Communications Summit, Gartner has released a list of 10 mobile technologies that it says will impact the growth of mobile applications and solutions for both consumers and enterprises.  The list covers a wide variety of technologies from widgets, to security, to location based technology.  Here is my summary of Gartner’s list

  1. Bluetooth (3 and 4):  Gartner says to expect enhanced Bluetooth versions that will speed data transmission and enable communication with a wider range handsets and PC peripherals.
  2. The Mobile Web:  Gartner says that as mobile devices with larger screens hit the market, we’ll want to use those devices to access websites.
  3. Mobile Widgets:  Gartner says that widgets will play a big part in the emerging mobile application market.
  4. Platform-Independent Mobile AD Tools:  Developers need tools that help them develop platform-independent mobile applications.
  5. App Stores:  Gartner expects that App stores will be the primary way to distribute mobile application solutions and services.
  6. Enhanced Location Awareness:   Location awareness technologies, including GPS, Wi-Fi and cell ID systems, will be used to exploit location-based services and applications. .
  7. Cellular Broadband:  The growth in mobile applications and services will require enhancements to the broadband networks.
  8. Touchscreens:  Touch and touch-related technologies will play an important part in the emerging mobile application solution marketplace.
  9. M2M:  Gartner says to watch machine to machine technologies in many applications areas, including meter reading, security/surveillance, automotive systems, and retail.
  10. Device-Independent Security:  Gartner says to expect a focus on emerging security technologies as CIOs look to deliver applications across a wider range of devices, while still controlling security risks.

I think we can all agree that mobile and wireless is a very hot area in 2010 and that it will continue to heat up over the next few years.   So its pretty important to keep an eye on the emerging technologies that will become important in the mobile application infrastructure.   It certainly is one of the top trends on my radar screen. 

For more information, check out these resources from Gartner

AdWeek: Top Digital Advertising Trends for 2010

Adweek

AdWeek recently published a list “Top Digital Trends for 2010” that provides an interesting perspective from the Advertising Industry’s point of view.  When you think what has happened in the last 10 years from the advertising and media industry’s perspective, you realize their industry has been totally disrupted.  Traditional business models that worked from the 50’s through the 90’s are all at risk as the digital world is rocking their boat.

Here’s my summary of AdWeek’s list of digital trends for 2010.

  1. Content at Scale.  AdWeek uses AOL as an example of a company that is trying to figure out how scale up to produce content that people (and advertisers) want at as low a price as possible.
  2. The End of the Digital Agency.  Adweek says line is blurring between digital and traditional ad agencies as the digital agencies try to scale up with new services and the traditional agencies develop expertise in the digital world.
  3. Social Gaming.  AdWeek uses examples like FourSquare and Zynga to demonstrate that people are spending real money on virtual goods and services.  Marketers need to learn how to leverage this trend in their marketing efforts.
  4. Demand-Side Platforms.  Adweek says that in 2010, internet advertising will remain inefficient to buy and sell, but there are some innovations that could disrupt the digital publishing landscape with more automation.
  5. Engagement Pricing.  In 2010, we should all expect some progress to be made in the area of new pricing mechanisms that better reflect goals of the ad strategy. 
  6. Augmented Reality Grows Up.  Adweek expects AR and mobile to converge in 2010 to provide an array of useful services.
  7. Social Media Morphs into Digital.  2010 will be the year when publishers and marketers will look at social as an integral part of their digital strategy, rather than a stand-alone area for experimentation.
  8. Privacy Wars.  AdWeek expects that focus on consumer privacy to heat up again in 2010 as consumer’s demand more ways to opt-out of ads they don’t want and opt-out of all the ad tracking tools.
  9. Data Gets Creative.  AdWeek says that in 2010, more and more advertisers will integrate data visualization technologies into their programs in order to help consumer find interesting trends and then act on that information
  10. The Year of Mobile, Finally.  AdWeek says after many years of predicting that mobile advertising will take off,  2010 should be the inflection point, thanks to location-based services.

All ten trends are ones that will be interesting to watch.  I’m especially going to be watching #3, #7, and #10.  For more detail behind each of the ten trends above, check out AdWeek’s article at Top Digital Trends for 2010