IBM: CIO Study Identifies Top 8 Emerging IT Project Areas

If you did not catch the news last week that IBM announced findings from its latest research into what’s on CIO’s minds these days.  The study, The Global CIO Study 2009, is titled “The New Voice of the CIO”.   This post contains a quick summary of the findings.

The big news is that 83% of the survey respondents identified business intelligence and analytics – the ability to see patterns in vast amounts of data and extract actionable insights– as the way they will enhance their organizations competitiveness.   With an increased focus on data analytics, the survey also revealed that data reliability and security have emerged as increasingly urgent concerns, with 71 percent of CIOs planning to make additional investments in risk management and compliance.

As the role of the CIO itself transforms so do the types of projects they lead across their enterprises, which will allow CIOs to focus less time and resources on running internal infrastructure, and more time on transformation to help their companies grow revenue. CIOs are transforming their infrastructure to focus more on innovation and business value, rather than simply running IT.

Findings include:

  • 76% of CIOs are undergoing or planning virtualization projects, mostly in an attempt to lower energy costs.
  • 76% of CIOs anticipate a movement towards centralized infrastructures in the next five years.
  • Slightly more than half are expecting to implement completely standardized, low-cost business processes.
  • CIOs focus 55% of their time on activities that drive innovation and growth, whereas traditional IT tasks like infrastructure and operations management now make up only 45 percent.

CIOs also identified the top eight emerging IT project areas, including

  1. Business intelligence and analytics
  2. Virtualization and green IT
  3. Service oriented architectures (SOA)
  4. Service management
  5. Cloud computing
  6. Mobility solutions
  7. Unified communications
  8. Collaboration, social networking tools, and Web 2.0 projects

About the Study:  The Global CIO Study 2009 is perhaps the largest face-to-face survey of CIOs ever conducted.  2500 CIOs from 78 countries, 19 industries, and organizations of every size were interviewed.  The research was conducted over a four month period from January to April 2009.  The full 2009 CIO Study, podcasts and video interviews about the study are available at www.ibm.com/ciostudy.

Netpop: Consumer Use of Social Networks Exploding

Are you finding you are spending more time after work hours on the Internet instead of seeking other forms of entertainment?   More time on the Internet instead of watching TV or renting a DVD? 

In my household, we are all spending more time online and less time watching TV shows and DVDs.  Less time playing board games and more time playing online games.  My two teenage daughters are texting, ‘Facebooking’ (is facebooking a verb?), and visiting all other sorts of social sites.  I have dramtically increased my time with Linked In, Facebook ,and Twitter more the last 6 months.  My wife has not made the transition to social media yet, but I do see her on her laptop using email to communicate, instead of watching her favorite TV shows.  As our family spends more and more time on the computer, I am thinking more and more about stripping the digital TV cable services down to bare minimum.  We can always access TV shows from sites like NBC direct, Hulu, and YouTube.

Curious, I did some research to find if there were any research studies on this. 

Netpop Research recently released a study, "Netpop | Connect: Media Shifts to Social", that shows that the amount of time U.S. broadband users spend online has risen significantly in the last couple of years.   Netpop's study found that time spent social networking has grown 93% since 2006.  This rise means that around a third (32%) of U.S. Internet users' online time is spent communicating. 

So what are consumers spending less time doing if they're tied up in virtual conversation?  According to the study, communication has increased at the cost of time spent on traditional forms of online entertainment, which has fallen 29% over the last two years to just 19% of total online time.  

In an another report “Connect:  Social Networkers 2008” from Netpop published in late 2008, findings indicated that 76% of all U.S. broadband users actively contribute to social media sites in one form or another, and 29% contribute regularly to social

It seems the definition of entertainment online is changing from an "entertain me" standpoint to include hanging out with friends online and sharing opinions and information – socializing.    You could surmise that the boundaries between entertainment and communication are blurring.

This is a disruptive force to those companies that relied totally on traditional broadcast advertising.  Companies must now rethink how they reach consumers.   They must commit more of their online "space" to user-generated content and social media that enables direct communication with consumers.   If companies don't provide these spaces, they will find it harder to track and engage consumers because, suggests Netpop, they will simply go off and create their own elsewhere.  

So companies must figure out how to engage with users on social media sites, give consumers/customers a voice, spend time learning how to listen and learn on these sites, and figure out how to enable their 'fans' to influence others.  With over 40 million Americans now contributing to social networking sites in one form or another, this is clearly a lucrative market for advertisers, but also one that is very different from more traditional online and offline media sources. 

The other question in all of this is how is this transition of family time to social sites impacting the family structure?  How will the families of the future bond if they are all off on their computers socializing with others, instead socializing with family members (playing board games, watching TV shows, etc.).  The burden will be on parents to force family time into everyone’s schedule….and it will be a tough task at that!!

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