Enterprise Security: 10 Experts Who Tweet and Blog

For the HorizonWatching Trend 2014 report:  Enterprise IT Security Trends to Watch in 2014 I wanted to provide a list of people who are active on social networks and are talking about issues related to Enterprise IT Security.

So I did some research on Twitter to find people with large numbers of followers who were talking about the Enterprise Security topic.   I would not necessary call these people influencers, but they do have extensive reach.  When they tweet, they have the potential to reach many people.   In addition to being active on Twitter, these people are all out on LinkedIn (link to their profile provided below) and all of these people blog as well.  In my trend report, I provide links to their blogs.

These people are all producing and sharing thought leadership and opinions about the current and future state of enterprise security.

Below I provide a list of ten people (a subset of my list of the full list of 20 people you will find in Enterprise IT Security Trends to Watch in 2014 ).   If you are in the Enterprise Security area, I’d suggest following these people, check out their blogs, and perhaps striking up a relationship with them.

LinkedIn

Title & Company

Twitter ID

Eugene Kaspersky

CEO and Co-Founder Kaspersky Lab

e_kapersky

Mukesh Sharma

CEO & Founder,  iHackers

iHackers

Brian Krebs

Founder, Krebs on Security LLC

briankrebs

Bruce Schneier

Fellow, Harvard Law School

schneierblog

Jermiah Grossman

CTO, WhiteHat Security, Inc.

jeremiahg

Chris Wysopal

CTO, Veracode

WeldPond

Angela Orebaugh

Fellow, Booz Allen Hamilton

AngelaOrebaugh

Mohit Kumar

Senior Executive at Deloitte

unix_root

Rich Mogull

Security Editor, TidBITS

rmogull

Dan Philpott

Founder, FISMApedia

danphilpott

Top Ten Digital Marketing Trends For 2011

If you are in the marketing profession, I think you’ll agree that our profession is experiencing some major disruption.

Top Ten Digital Marketing Trends for 2011 - HorizonWatching The traditional marketing theory and methods I learned at Kellogg Graduate School of Management back in the mid-90’s are still very valid.  Half the battle is still doing the all important work of market segmentation, targeting, and positioning. I still refer to my 7th edition of Phil Kotler’s textbook Marketing Management from time to time (although that book is now in it’s 12th edition!)

However, back in 1995, we had no clue just how much the Internet would impact marketing over the next 15 years.  And the impact has been very significant. The Internet has turned into a game changer for marketing. 

Leading edge marketing professionals understand that they need to learn how to leverage all the new digital marketing capabilities.  It is a great opportunity to build brand value, increase revenues, and cut down on marketing expenses.

So with that in mind, lets take a look at the top trends in online / digital marketing for 2011. 

  1. Marketing Budgets Will Continue to Shift Towards Online.  Customers and prospects are increasingly going online early in the buying cycle to gather information, form relationships, and make decisions about how they will buy.  As a result, marketing leaders must move marketing mix budgets to mirror where the customers and prospects are – online.  Online channels can reach a very targeted audience, are lower cost, and are becoming more measurable.  As a result we should expect the continued decline in the use of traditional media.  This cannibalization of traditional media will bring about new marketing channels, professions, and processes as well as a decline in overall advertising budgets.  Traditional agencies and publishers must transform their businesses to include digital marketing capabilities.
  2. Social Media Marketing Is Maturing.  Those in the marketing profession can sense that we are in the middle of an important transition to the use of social media for marketing purposes.  While the past few years many marketers have been experimenting with social media tactics, in 2011, leading marketing teams will be executing social tactics that are fully integrated into the overall marketing strategy. An overall social media marketing process will emerge that has firms following a never ending cycle of 1)Research, 2) Plan, 3)  Engage and 4) Measure.  Simultaneously, a new set of marketing capabilities are emerging, including Social Listening Research, Influencer Marketing, Community Marketing, and Social Gaming.  These new capabilities will require new marketing marketing professional Career Paths and Education tailored to the new social media marketing realities. 
  3. Mobile Marketing Set To Take Off.  In conjunction with the Social Media Marketing trend described above, the interest in mobile marketing has exploded, driven by the tremendous success of and media buzz around Apple’s iPhone, Google’s introduction of Android, and Apple’s introduction of the iPad.  As smartphone adoption grows, mobile marketing will expand beyond mobile messaging, and make mobile email, mobile websites and mobile applications viable channels in which to conduct marketing.  The combination of new devices, faster networks and new location-aware technology, will fuel this steady march toward greater significance.  Some key mobile marketing trends to watch in 2011 include Location Based Services, Mobile Apps, Mobile Gaming, Event-Based Mobile Marketing, and Augmented Reality.
  4. Personalized Marketing Customizes Messages To Individual.  Expect more personalization capability to be embedded in websites in 2011.  Regular visitors to a web site will see a page based on all the information collected from previous visits.  Marketers will present personalized sites to these customers by organizing information and prioritizing it based on the individual's liking.  Products and services offered on those pages will be pre-configured. “Anonymous” visitors to websites will get customized messages based on referring URL, search terms, geo-location and other insights.  Personalized marketing will be extended beyond the website to other digital channels, including social media marketing, mobile marketing, and email marketing.
  5. Social Video As A Marketing Tool Gains Momentum.  Video is an incredible way to connect with people online.  Until the Internet, the only way to get your video message to a mass audience was to pay for a TV commercial.  Today, social media sites and video go hand in hand. Distributing video via your social networks is a powerful way to imprint your images into the memory of your customers and prospects.  Video strengthens the relationships you have with existing customers and it helps prospects get to know you better.  So in 2011, there will be a focus among digital marketing professionals to understand how to make the best use of Video Marketing within Social Media Marketing Strategies and Programs.
  6. Search Engine Optimization Gets More Complex.  Customers naturally use search engines as their primary vehicle to find information on products and services.  But its not a one search engine game anymore as Google’s been joined by Bing in the US market and there are important local players like China’s Baidu and Russia’s Yandex.  On top of that, social sites like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn are increasingly becoming an important source for searching.  Add to that search engine innovation, mobile search, and geo-location search and the job of the marketing professional to ensure their brand is on the first page of search results gets so much more complex.
  7. Marketing Analytics Helps Make Sense Of All The Noise.  The explosion of social conversations across the many online channels is providing marketers with a never ending stream of incoming data.  The challenge for marketing professionals is to turn all that data into insights and then develop strategies/actions based on those insights.  Marketing analytics applications can help, but they need to get better at integrating data from all sources (web, search, video, mobile, and social conversations).  Analytic applications will also need to get smarter and more predictive about customer buying preferences based on all that data.   In 2011, I expect to see a focus on the development of advanced analytic capabilities that can identify, analyze and describe patterns within all the information “noise”, giving marketing professionals important predictive insights they can use for making better decisions.
  8. Real Time Web Assistance Connects Buyer With Experts.  Online customers and consumers are some of the most impatient and demanding around.  They expect answers from your online support group right away.  Live chat services allow operators to interact with online customers and respond to their questions quickly, helping you convert web queries into customers and site traffic into transactions.  In 2011 watch for leading edge companies to combine the use of Twitter customer service accounts and the real-time chat services to provide ways of connecting product / service experts with customers in real-time in order to solve customer business issues.
  9. Online Privacy Concerns Continue.  Privacy issues continue to be an important trend for marketing professionals to be out in front of as government regulators have threatened to legislate solutions if the industry does not take action by itself.  Creating a secure online transactional environment is absolutely critical to a maintaining trust in customer relationships.  All it takes is one significant privacy issue to negatively impact a brand.  Privacy concerns from customers have forced brands like Facebook and Google to continually adjust their business models.  As enterprise marketing gets more social and mobile, privacy issues must be dealt with very carefully. 
  10. Digital Marketing Optimization Emerges As A Priority.  The past few years we have seen new ‘islands’ of marketing capabilities emerge within the marketing profession.  We are moving beyond Web 2.0 with all sorts of new channels and capabilities including mobile (messaging, websites, apps), rich media (video, podcasting, gaming), social media (blogs, microblogging, social networks, user generated content), and more.  The state of digital marketing is such that these ‘islands’ are not well integrated into an overall cohesive strategy.  In 2011 expect to see a focus from marketing leaders to focus on optimizing and integrating these separate initiatives into an overall umbrella digital marketing strategy.

So these are the online and digital marketing trends I’ll be watching closely in 2011.  A look through the above list tells you that there is so happening in online marketing.  As it is in almost every industry, Internet technology is totally changing the rules.   

InfoBoom: How Can CIOs Leverage Social Computing?

InfoBoom Mar16 This week I have authored the featured article on The InfoBOOM! community site (www.theinfoboom.com).  The article is written for CIOs, CTOs, and IT Leaders who have yet to get involved in the social media or who are wondering how to implement social computing solutions. 

If you know of any IT leaders, you may want to point them to the article.  It will be interesting to hear from CIOs what their challenges are with this disruptive trend.

About The Article

The article, Opening the Social Computing Door, provides some guidance for CIOs and IT leaders on how they can start leveraging social computing in their careers and for the enterprises they serve.  There is much work to do.  My research has shown that there are a relatively few number of CIOs that are truly demonstrating leadership in the social media today.

I break the article up into four sections

  1. Participating in Conversations
  2. Gaining Business Leverage
  3. Getting Smarter
  4. Jumping In

I provide links to research I’ve done that shed some like on what leading CIOs are doing in the social media and how it can be leveraged in the enterprise environment.   It’s my hope the article helps CIOs and IT leaders get started.  I’d be interested in any feedback you may have. 

About InfoBOOM!

The InfoBOOM! community has been developed via a partnership between CIO.com and IBM.  The site is about a year old and is an online community environment that fosters the free exchange of ideas among experts, midmarket CIOs and technology leaders.   The focus is on giving IT leaders at small and mid-sized firms the insights and perspectives they need on vital issues.  Each week, a new expert is featured and an article is written by that expert that provides a point of view on an important topic.  Then, Jim Malone, Senior Editorial Director a CIO.com authors a complementary or contrarian view.   As a result of the two articles, important discussion and collaboration happens each week on the selected topic.   Thus each week InfoBOOM! fosters open dialogue and contrary points of view between the editor, experts and members.  I encourage you to check out the site at http://www.theinfoboom.com

Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media


Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media

Yesterday my post here was titled 2009 CIO Award Winners Are Not Embracing Social Media.  In that post I provided the results of some research I did to understand if CIOs and IT Leaders who had received Industry related awards in 2009 were participating in the social media.  I found that those award winners I did research on had not embraced the social media trend.

Today, I provide the other end of the spectrum:  The Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in the Social Media. 

For this post, I set out to find those practicing CIOs, CTOs, and IT Leaders who have embraced the social media with passion.  I scoured the Net to find CIO’s that are blogging and tweeting about issues and events that are important to CIOs and the IT industry in general.  These are the CIOs that are actively creating and participating in discussions in the social media.  They are sharing their experiences and ideas in the public Internet, instead of holding these experiences and ideas to themselves.

In addition to the blogging and tweeting, I was also interested in finding CIOs that were actively building their LinkedIn profile and connecting with others through LinkedIn.  

I found about 65 CIOs during my research.  I then developed a ranking system by scoring CIOs on a number of criteria, including the currency and frequency of their blog posts, the richness of their LinkedIn profile, and their participation on Twitter.  A quick sort by the total score and I have a list of the top 50 as displayed below.

Some stats from the list of 50.

  • 80% of those on the list are blogging on a public website.
  • 92% are actively using Twitter
  • 96% have a LinkedIn profile
  • 66% are on Facebook (note:  Facebook usage did not enter into my scoring and ranking system)

So here is the list of the top 50 CIO and IT Leaders I came up with.  I’ve provided links to their Blogs, their Twitter IDs, and their LinkedIn Profiles.  I encourage you to explore those links and learn from their posts and tweets.  More importantly, I encourage you to  participate in the discussions they are having by commenting on their blogs and responding to their tweets.  Perhaps they will even inspire you to start blogging or tweeting your ideas and thoughts about the important issues facing CIOs today.

Top 50 CIO and IT Leaders in Social Media

   

Name

Title/Industry/Social Sites

1

John Moore

CTO, and SVP of Engineering at Swimfish

Industry:  Technology  

LinkedIn:  John Moore

Blog:  John Moore's Weblog

Twitter: JohnFMoore

2

Phil Windley, Ph.D

CTO, Kynetx

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Phil Windley

Blog:  Windley’s Techometria

Twitter: windley

3

Bob Gourley

CTO and founder of Crucial Point LLC

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Bob Gourley

Blog:  CTOvision.com

Twitter: bobgourley

3

Andy Blumenthal

CTO, Bureau of ATF

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Andy Blumenthal

Blog:  Andy Blumenthal

Twitter: totalcio

5

John Halamka, MD

CIO, Harvard

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  John Halamka

Blog:  Healthcare CIO

Twitter: jhalamka

6

Chuck Musciano

CIO at Martin Marietta Materials

Industry:  Manufacturing/Aerospace

LinkedIn:  Chuck Musciano

Blog:  The Effective CIO

Twitter: EffectiveCIO

6

Werner Vogels

CTO, Amazon.com

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Werner Vogels

Blog:  All Things Distributed

Twitter: werner

6

Andrew Hoppin

CIO, New York State Senate

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Andrew Hoppin

Blog:  globehoppin

Twitter: ahoppin

9

Padmasree Warrior

CTO, Cisco

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
CiscoCTO Blog

Twitter: Padmasree

9

Shawn Riley

CTO, Austin Med. Cntr., Mayo Clinic Health System

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Shawn Riley

Blog:  HealthTechnica

Twitter: rilescat

11

Mark Cummuta

CIO @JobAngels

Industry:  Consumer Services

LinkedIn:  Mark Cummuta

Blog:  CIO Job Search

Twitter: TriumphCIO

11

Dave Fletcher

CIO, State of Utah

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Dave Fletcher

Blog:  Dave Fletcher's Gov. and Tech. Weblog

Twitter: dfletcher

11

John David Son

CIO, Marshall County School District

Industry:  Education

LinkedIn:  John Son

Blog:  CIO Corner

Twitter: JDSCIO

11

Isaac Sacolick

VP, Technology, McGraw-Hill

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Isaac Sacolick

Blog:  Social, Agile, & Transformation

Twitter: nyike

15

Steve Francia

CIO, Portero

Industry:  Retail

LinkedIn:  Steve Francia

Blog:  spf13

Twitter: spf13

15

Tony Maro

CIO for EvriChart

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Tony Maro

Blog:  OssRamblings.com

Twitter: tonymaro

15

Mark A. Silver

CIO, Health Svcs Div., Siemens Healthcare USA

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Mark A. Silver

Blog:  Social Media and Business Insights    
Twitter:
MarkSilver

15

Jim Haughwout

CIO, Neighborhood America (Florida)

Industry:  Consumer Services

LinkedIn:  Jim Haughwout

Blog:  Ex·se·cu·tus

Twitter: JHaughwout

19

Brian Blanchard

Chairman at St. Louis Innovation Camp

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Brian Blanchard

Blog:  Dev Revival

Twitter: BrianBlanchard

19

Chuck Hollis

VP and CTO of Marketing, EMC

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
Chuck's blog

Twitter: chuckhollis

19

Hubert Vaudaux

CTO at FBA (www.groupefb.fr)

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Hubert Vaudaux

Blog:  HVaudaux Le Blog 
Twitter:
hvaudaux

19

Bill Schrier

CTO, City of Seattle

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Bill Schrier

Blog:  The Chief Seattle Geek Blog

Twitter: billschrier

23

Casey Coleman

CIO, U.S. General Services Administration

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Casey Coleman

Blog:  Around the Corner

Twitter: caseycoleman

23

Linda Cureton

CIO, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Linda Cureton

Blog:  Goddard-CIO-Blog

Twitter: Curetonl

23

Mike Schaffner

Dir. IT, Cameron

Industry:  Oil & Gas

LinkedIn:  Mike Schaffner

Blog:  Beyond Blinking Lights and Acronyms

Twitter: MikeSchaffner

26

John McMillen

CIO, Graves County Schools in Mayfield, KY, USA

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  John D McMillen

Blog:  Techucation

Twitter: ujdmc

26

Peter Kretzman

CIO/CTO

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Peter Kretzman

Blog:  CTO/CIO Perspectives

Twitter: PeterKretzman

26

Nigel Fortlage

VP, IT at GHY International

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Nigel Fortlage

Blog:  My Thoughts

Twitter: nfortlage

26

Arun Manansingh

CIO, FusionLatina, LLC

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Arun Manansingh

Blog:  A CiO’s Voice

Twitter: solus72

30

Colin Osburn

CIO at Intelligentz Corporation

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Colin Osburn

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
colinosburn

30

Will Weider

CIO, Affinity Health System

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Will Weider

Blog:  Candid CIO

Twitter: CandidCIO

32

Lev Gonick

VP, IT Services, Case Western Reserve Univ.

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  Lev Gonick

Blog:  Bytes From Lev

Twitter: lgonick

32

Ian Cohen

CIO, Jardine Lloyd Thompson plc

Industry:  Financial

LinkedIn:  Ian Cohen

Blog:  The Accidental CIO

Twitter: coe62

34

Paul Cheesbrough

CIO, Telegraph Media Group

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn:  Paul Cheesbrough

Blog:  Paul Cheesbrough

Twitter: paulcheesbrough

34

Stephen Gillett

CIO & GM of Digital Ventures, Starbucks

Industry:  Retail

LinkedIn:  Stephen Gillett

Blog:  The Guild CIO

Twitter: @stephengillett

36

Eric Egnet

CIO, Vitalize Consuilting Solutions

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Eric Egnet

Blog:  In The Know CIO

Twitter: InTheKnowCIO

36

Omri Tintpulver

CIO, Brunico Communications

Industry:  Media

LinkedIn: Omri Tintpulver

Blog:  Omri Tintpulver

Twitter: omri

36

John Suffolk

CIO, UK government

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  John Suffolk

Blog:  John Suffolk – Government CIO

Twitter: GovCIO

39

Chris Marsh

CIO, Aviacode

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  Chris Marsh

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
theChrisMarsh

39

Katherine Coomb

CIO, Morrison Facilities Services

Industry:  Services

LinkedIn:  Katherine Coomb

Blog:  Banking on IT

Twitter: kat_woman

41

Vivek Kundra

CIO, US government

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Vivek Kundra

Blog:  IT Dashboard

Twitter: VivekKundra

41

Dr. Andy Chun

CIO, City University of Hong Kong

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Andy Chun

Blog:  CIO's Blog

Twitter: CityUCIO

41

Eachan Fletcher

CIO, Sporting Index

Industry:  Leisure

LinkedIn:  Eachan Fletcher

Blog:  The Fletcher Project

Twitter: n/a

44

Victor Fetter

Global VP, Dell

Industry:  Technology

LinkedIn:  Victor Fetter

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
vpfetter

44

Peter Birley

IT Dir., Brown Jacobson, LLP

Industry:  Legal

LinkedIn:  Peter Birley

Blog:  CIO blog

Twitter: birlep

44

Robert Carey

CIO, U.S. Navy

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  n/a

Blog: 
doncio

Twitter: n/a

47

Janet Claggett

CIO, Richland County, S.C.

Industry:  Government

LinkedIn:  Janet Claggett

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
cio007

48

Steve Mannina

CIO Cook County Treasure's office

Industry:    Government

LinkedIn:  Steve Mannina

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
smannina

48

Scott Lowe

CIO, Westminster College (Fulton, Mo.)

Industry:    Education

LinkedIn:  Scott Lowe

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
scottdlowe

48

R. Todd Thomas

CIO, Austin Radiological Association

Industry:  Healthcare

LinkedIn:  R. Todd Thomas

Blog:  n/a

Twitter:
thomast360

As you look through the list, you will see that there are more than a fair share of CIOs from Healthcare & Government on the list.  I’m not sure why, but that could be a question for further research.

seomoz: 8 Predictions for Search Engine Optimization in 2010

COINS08 Over the last year, I’ve grown more interested in Search Engine Optimization.  It appears to be a mix of art and science. 

As I am watching for 2010 predictions and trends information, a recent post from seomoz’s CEO Rand Fishkin caught my eye.  In 2009, Rand co-authored the Art of SEO from O'Reilly Media and was named among the 30 Best Young Tech Entrepreneurs Under 30 by BusinessWeek. 

The title of Rand’s post is 8 Predictions for SEO in 2010.  Here’s Rand’s list:

  1. This Real-Time Search Thing is Outta Here
  2. Twitter's "Link Graph" is the Real Deal
  3. Personalized Search is Here to Stay
  4. It's Going to Be a Two-Engine, 80/20 World
  5. Site Explorer & Linkdomain will Disappear
  6. SEO Spending Will Rise Dramatically
  7. 2010 is the Year of Conversion Rate Optimization
  8. More Queries will Send Less Traffic

The post 8 Predictions for SEO in 2010 provides a bunch of detail on each of the 8 predictions.  I suggest you check it out.

Business.com: 2009 Business Social Media Benchmarking Study

BusinessCOM SM Report Business.com recently released their 2009 Business Social Media Benchmarking Study.   The objective of the study was to assess current trends in the use of social media in North American businesses.  

The results of the study were based on the 2,948 valid responses to Business.com’s survey during August and early September, 2009 and the report provides an interesting view into where businesses are finding value in social media across different activities and sites. 

The report is organized into two sections. The first section discusses how business people utilize social media today to find business-relevant information.  The second section covers corporate social media initiatives, benchmarking experience with social media for business (both respondent and company), top social media activities and how companies judge social media success today.

Highlights

Nearly 65% of respondents reported using social media as part of their normal work routine, including reading blogs, visiting business profiles on sites like Facebook or LinkedIn or using Twitter to find information and/or communicate about business-related matters

Among those using any form of social media to find business-relevant information, the most popular activity is attending webinars or listening to podcasts (69%) followed by reading  ratings/reviews for business products or services (62%). The least popular activities are saving business-related links on social bookmarking sites (28%) and participating in discussions on 3rd party web sites (29%).

Major Findings

  • Over 1900 participants in the study indicated that they work for a company involved in social media initiatives. 92% are directly involved in planning or managing these initiatives.
  • On average, these individuals spend 18% of their time in any given week working on these initiatives.
  • 71% of the companies surveyed have less than two years of experience with social media.
  • The average company in the study is currently involved in 7 different social media efforts.
  • Top activities include – maintaining company related accounts and profiles on social media sites (70%), followed by monitoring company-related mentions on social media sites (60%) and maintaining one or more company blogs (60%).
  • 66% of social media initiatives are driven by marketing, followed by 23% by customer support and 8% by product development departments.
  • On average, companies use four different metrics to measure their social media initiatives – web site traffic, engagement with prospects and customers, brand impact – basically awareness and reputation, quantity and quality of leads
  • 80% maintain a presence on Facebook.
  • 56% have a company account on Twitter.
  • A typical company in the study, maintains a presence on three different social media sites. 
  • 47% of companies in the study upload content to one or more content sharing sites. So, although they may have a profile on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or YouTube, some companies may not be regularly sharing content. Over commitment to many social media initiatives at any one time has been sited by numerous case studies as a driving factor behind poor social media performance.  
  • YouTube is the leading business content sharing site; used by 65% of those in the study that share content online.

Report’s Table of Contents

The report table of contents below can give you a feel for the type of information in the report:

  • Beyond Chatting with Friends: Social Media as a Business Resource
    • Who Uses Social Media as a Resource for Business Information?
    • Most Popular Social Media Resources for Business
  • Most Useful Social Media Resources for Business
  • Current State of Corporate Social Media Initiatives
    • Respondent and Company Experience with Business Social Media
    • Top Corporate Social Media Activitie
    • How Companies Judge Social Media Succes
    • Initiative Detail: Managing Business Profiles on Social Media Site
    • Initiative Detail: Participating in Q&A Site
    • Initiative Detail: Using Social Media Monitoring Tool
    • Initiative Detail: Sharing Business Content on Social Media Sites
    • Initiative Detail: Business Content Bookmarking on Social Media Sites

The full report can be downloaded via the following link:  http://www.business.com/info/business-social-media-benchmark-study

MS and Google: Searching Social Media

Searching for information is so much a part of my job.  Frequently when on an intense research project, I find myself day dreaming of search keyword string being entered into the Google search bar.  But over the past year, I’m increasingly finding myself using other search engines that crawl the social media sites.  I now have a list of about 15 social search engines that I use depending on what type of information I am looking for.

As social computing technology continues to result in growth of social networking and social media sites, searching for content on all these sites is becoming more and more important.  Social search is the next big thing in search engines and over the last week or so, there have been some big changes in the social search marketplace.

Both Google and Microsoft announced deals to improve their search engines.  Both Microsoft and Google both made deals with Twitter to include tweets in their real-time social search results.  But Microsoft did Google one better and announced it will also include content from Facebook. 

Microsoft’s Bing users will will be able to search Twitter status updates or navigate the most popular topics currently being discussed on Twitter via a tag cloud.  Bing will search the last seven days, of content and will be organized into 1) Tweets and 2) Frequently shared links

Google’s Social Search, still in beta, works off your Google profile (you have to opt-in) and prioritizes results from your friends' Twitter feeds, FriendFeed updates, Facebook pages, LinkedIn profiles, and Picasa libraries.  For more on Google search, check out this 3 minute video

These announcements signal that the big search engines have recognized the importance of social search to their future. As the social movement continues to grow and people's hunger for real-time content increases, search companies are actively looking to provide the most value and relevant search results.

For more information, here’s some recent articles about social search

Google’s Top 20 Twitter Accounts

Here’s a list of the top twenty Google Twitter accounts, based on the number of followers that ID has. 

Notes: 

  • The following information was pulled on October 20, 2009. 
  • #DLSP represents the number of days since last the last post on Twitter.
  • The columns might not match up with the column headings all that well.  Seems to depend on the browser.
Category Account Description

Followers

Tweets

#DSLP

General Google Google's main account 1,780,160 774 0
General YouTube for YouTube fans 163,883 1,101 0
General GoogleReader from Google's feed reader team 29,952 209 15
Ads AdSense for online publishers 29,931 103 5
General GoogleNews latest headlines via Google News 24,699 2,333 0
Earth GoogleMaps uses, tips, mashups 22,509 534 0
General Blogger for Blogger fans 22,248 461 0
General GoogleVoice updates & info on Google Voice 21,174 134 7
General GoogleAtWork solutions for workplace productivity 18,724 891 0
Developer GoogleResearch from Google's research scientists 14,637 66 61
General GoogleCalendar user tips & updates 12,972 93 0
Developer app_engine web apps run on Google infrastructure 12,880 176 5
Developer GoogleCode For Google developer products 10,638 88 6
Developer GoogleIO Google's largest annual developer event 8,830 258 0
General GoogleStudents news of interest to students 8,819 273 0
Earth GoogleEarth updates from the Google Earth team 7,724 130 0
Ads GoogleAnalytics insights for website effectiveness 7,552 33 4
Culture googlejobs the voice of Google recruiters 7,324 173 1
General iGoogle Google's personalized homepage 6,674 89 5
General GoogleImages Google visual image search 6,483 28 72

Study On Social Media Use By Fortune 100 Companies

PATT2060An interesting study released from an analysis by Burson-Marsteller and Proof Digital of the Fortune 100's use of Key Social Media Channels, including Twitter, Facebook Fan Pages and Blogs. 

The results of the study shows that Twitter surpassed blogging here in 2009 as the social media platform of choice – at least among the Fortune 100.   The study looked at the top 100 companies in terms of revenue as compiled by Fortune Magazine's annual Fortune 500 to understand how active those compa nies were on three key social media: Twitter, Facebook and Blogs.  .

Some highlights from the study include

  • 54% of the Fortune 100 were using Twitter to reach out directly to stakeholders, 32% were using a blogs, and 29% were actively using a Facebook Fan Page to engage.  
  • 21% of companies are using only one of the three surveyed social media channels, and of those companies, 76% are using Twitter over Facebook and Blogs.
  • 40% of companies are not using any social media channels, while 21% are using two channels, and 17% are using all three.
  • 94% of Fortune 100 Twitter accounts distribute company news updates and announcements while fully 67% are at least partially serving a customer service function.
  • Reasons companies use the three social media sites differs.
    • Twitter is most often used for news and announcements (94%), customer service (67%), promotions and deals (57%), and job postings (11%).
    • Facebook fan pages are more consumer focused, with promotions, product information, and philanthropy and community service announcements.
    • Blog content falls into categories of current projects, external initiatives, and community involvement.

For more information, see this post on Burson-Marteller’s site.  And there’s a pdf file available on Slideshare of the report findings:  “Social Media Use by Fortune 100 Companies”.  

Study: Top CEOs still shunning Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn

As social networking and social media marketing continue to increase as a disruptive trend, our top executives are being left behind.  So far, they are ignoring the trend.  Not sure what their excuse is, but I imagine it is that they just don’t get it.  It reminds me of the time email first came on the radar.

Sure, CEOs aged 30 and under understand the power of Web 2.0 and social computing…some of the younger ones are in fact digital natives.  But for some reason, middle aged and older CEOs have not yet figured out that the social computing train has left the station. 

I have a unique perspective in that I have been around for a long time. Truth be told, I was around for the email revolution in the late 1980s and early 1990s'.   I was a young IT professional at the time email first came on the radar (anyone remember PROFS?) and I do remember that for the longest time there were people (typically older and higher up the executive chain) that just never checked their email.  I guess they either forgot their passwords or really did not even know how to check and respond to email.  It was hard for them to weave email into their daily activities.  They were tied to the phone and face to face method of communication (not to say those are bad communication methods) and ignored the new way of communicating via email.  They resisted change.

So when I saw an article discussing recent research results that confirm my observations that CEOs are absent from the social media, it does not surprise me.  The report in question (It’s Official:  Fortune 100 CEOs are Social Media Slackers) finds that CEOs at top companies in the U.S. are dramatically disconnected from the social networking phenomenon.  The report was recently published by UberCEO.com, an online news and discussion site that focuses on CEOs at major companies.  

The study found that only two CEOs from Fortune magazine's list of the Top 100 companies have Twitter accounts and only 19 have a Facebook page.   And none of the 100 CEOs were found to have a personal external blog.  

In fact, only 13 of the top top 100 CEOs are members of the LinkedIn social network for business professionals.  And of those 13, five were connected to just one other person on the site.  The study found that only three technology CEOs really stood out on LinkedIn

From my point of view, top CEOs in technology companies should be embracing web 2.0 and experimenting with social media and networking sites.  I believe they are missing an opportunity to positively influence how people view their companies as well as missing an opportunity to demonstrate leadership to their employees, customers, partners, and shareholders.  It’s called leading by example and in my mind technology CEOs can't afford to pretend that social media is not for them.  They need to find some way to weave social media activities into their daily routine….just like the rest of us.

Social Networking Usage Is Growing

According to a recent report issued by the Conference Board, almost half Internet users in the U.S. now take part in online social networks such as Facebook, MySpace and LinkedIn.  This is almost twice the rate measured just one year ago via the Conference Board’s quarterly Consumer Internet Barometer.  The survey tracks about 10,000 Internet-equipped households nationwide.

Some highlights from the survey. 

  • 43 percent use a social networking Web site, up from 27 percent last year
  • Seniors age 55 and older are quickly increasing their use of social networks, up from 6 percent last year to 19 percent this year.
  • Women are more likely than men to use social-network sites (48 percent versus 38 percent).
  • The majority of users log on at home.   However, 25% log in at work and 10 percent are now connecting to networks via a mobile phone.
  • More than half say they log on at least once a day.
  • The most popular site is Facebook, used by 78 percent of social network participants, followed by MySpace (42 percent), LinkedIn (17 percent) and Twitter (10 percent).
  • Facebook is equally popular among men and women, while women are more likely than men (47 percent versus 35 percent) to use MySpace and more men than women (21 percent versus 15 percent) use LinkedIn.
  • Users of Twitter said their top reasons for "tweeting" are to connect with friends (42 percent), update their status (29 percent), look for news (26 percent) and for work-related reasons (22 percent)

The results from this survey confirm the trends I am observing in the social networks and on Twitter.  These tools are moving into the mainstream.  As the mainstream adoption picks up, businesses will also be adopting these tools as a way to become more productive, find new sources of revenue, and reduce costs.  My advice to businesses is to understand how these new tools can be used to improve your processes and workflows, including CRM/Customer Service, Product Development, and Marketing.

For more information on the latest Consumer Internet Barometer report, check out the press release here

Pew Internet: The Social Life of Health Information

The Pew Internet & American Life Project recently released a report, “The Social Life of Health Information”, that contains results from a survey on the way people are seeking out health information.   The survey was focused on U.S. respondents only. 

As can be expected, Americans are now turning more and more to online sources for information.   In the past, patients typically called a health professional, their Mom, or a good friend.  Today they are also searching online, reading blogs, listening to podcasts, updating their social network profile, and posting comments.   And many people, once they find health information online, talk with someone offline about that information they have found online.

Some interesting findings from this survey:

  • 57% of respondents use the Internet when locating health information
  • Two-thirds of people that find information online then discuss with someone else their findings
  • 60% of respondents have said that information they have found online has impacted the way they have then pursued treatment.
  • 41% of e-patients have read another person’s commentary or experience about health or medical issue

Also interesting was the finding that "e-patients" – what the authors called people who look online for health info – are more likely to engage in social media in general, compared with other Internet users.  For instance, e-patients are more likely than non-health seekers to have created or worked on their own blog, read someone else's blog, used a social networking site, used a micro-blogging site, and other activities.  Small numbers of people are using social software like Twitter and Facebook.  Mostly these services are used to follow another person’s health issue and then perhaps include their own commentary on the health issue. 

As use of the Internet and social media increases, it's not surprising that more people are searching for health information and participating and engaging in health-related communities.   As these people search for and create their own content, this will put added pressure on providers to embrace social media in order to participate in the discussion.

Read the entire report here: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/8-The-Social-Life-of-Health-Information.aspx.